Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Æther Salon - Coffee! (Unedited Transcript)


[14:02:13]  Zantabraxus : Greetings, Engacia, Ziggy
[14:02:33]  engacia: hello miss zantabraxus
[14:02:53]  Cherie Harcassle: yes roller skating can be tricky, especially if one is experimenting with the boot rockets
[14:02:59]  ZiggyFritz: Helloha, and thank you, Miss Zantabraxus.
[14:03:42]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Welcome to the new arrivals, we are giving it a few minutes for some stragglers to make it, then I will start. It will be a quieter salon tonight.
[14:06:49]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : Shall we begin, Frau Gräfin?
[14:07:16]  Wulfriðe Blitzen   nods
[14:08:20]  Magda Kamenev moves closer, just in case there are samples.
[14:08:40]  Zantabraxus  nudges Magda to the coffee
[14:08:42]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach  points at the coffee engine in the back
[14:08:45]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Welcome to the brave few tonight who have come to listen to this talk. There is so much to tell regarding the history of coffee that I don't have time to squeeze it all in, so I shall try and get as much said as possible in the allotted time. Feel free to ask questions along the way. All the following information can be found in various sources, books and articles online if you wish to explore the history of coffee further.
[14:09:17]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : The Arab world is never far from the news today, and people quickly forget it was once renown as a culture of scientists, free thinkers and inventions galore. This includes the three course meal with soup followed by fish or meat, then fruit and nuts. The habit was brought across to Moorish Spain in the 9th Century from Iraq. "Alcohol" derives from the Arabic "al kuhul"... many Arab countries, like Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Morocco, make wines and beers, even though Islam does not permit the drinking of alcohol. And lastly, coffee. Treasured by Muslim mystics for centuries, it was even briefly banned by Muslim nations. As we shall see, it has always courted intrigue and scandal throughout its recorded history
[14:09:59]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : For centuries its origins have been debated over by scholars till recent DNA research by Kew Gardens in London found  the oldest originated in the Ethiopian highlands. More worryingly, they also discovered that the plant has an incredibly narrow gene pool. Although there are 124 known species of coffee, most of the coffee that's grown comes from just two - Arabica and Robusta. This has made it incredibly vulnerable to climate change and fungal or insect attack, with the Arabica strain presently under threat of extinction similar to the sweeter Gros Michel banana, which was almost totally wiped before plantations replaced it with the more robust, but not as sweet Cavendish strain in the 1950's.
[14:10:55]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Personally, I will always prefer the tastier Arabica over the Robusta, and if you teach your tastebuds to refine themselves to flavours, you too will soon find yourself insisting on the same
[14:11:17]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : There is a third strain, little known, I shall mention that at the end
[14:11:27]  Magda Kamenev  unpacks a camp stove, a coffee mill, a small sack of beans, and a Turkish coffee pot.
[14:11:35]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : The earliest cultivation of coffee was in Yemen and Yemenis gave it the Arabic name qahwa, from which our words coffee and cafe both derive. 'Qahwa' originally meant wine, and Sufi mystics in Yemen used coffee as an aid to concentration and even spiritual intoxication when they chanted the name of Allah. By 1414, it was known in Mecca and in the early 1500s was spreading to Egypt from the Yemeni port of Mocha. It was still associated with Sufis, and a cluster of coffee houses grew up in Cairo around the religious university of the Azhar. They also opened in Syria, especially in the cosmopolitan city of Aleppo, and then in Istanbul, the capital of the vast Ottoman Turkish Empire, in 1554
[14:12:02]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : In Mecca, Cairo and Istanbul attempts were made to ban it by religious authorities. Learned shaykhs discussed whether the effects of coffee were similar to those of alcohol, and some remarked that passing round the coffee pot had something in common with the circulation of a pitcher of wine, a drink forbidden in Islam. Coffee houses were a new institution in which men met together to talk, listen to poets and play games like chess and backgammon. They became a focus for intellectual life and could be seen as an implicit rival to the mosque as a meeting place.
[14:12:27]  engacia unscrews her bottle of 'camp' coffee
[14:12:34]  Wulfriðe Blitzen   grins
[14:12:39]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Some scholars opined that the coffee house was "even worse than the wine room", and the authorities noted how these places could easily become dens of sedition. However, all attempts at banning coffee failed, even though the death penalty was used during the reign of Murad IV (1623-40). The religious scholars eventually came to a sensible consensus that coffee was, in principle, permissible. Marco Polo mentions it in his travels, and though it was a popular drink in the Arab nations where European traders often travelled to and even partook in the drink to discuss business, it was oddly one of the few things never brought back much into the west and only found in some high end Apothecary suppliers in large port cities. All this was about to change.
[14:13:23]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Coffee spread to Europe by two routes - from the Ottoman Empire, and by sea from the original coffee port of Mocha. Coffee also arrived in Europe through trade across the Mediterranean and was carried by the Turkish armies as they marched up the Danube. As in the Middle East, the coffee house became a place for men to talk, read, share their opinions on the issues of the day and play games as its popularity slowly spread further and further west.
[14:13:46]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : By the early 17thc Coffee began to be mentioned by English Captains returning from the east as a recommended medicinal drink. At first, coffee had been viewed with suspicion in Europe as a Muslim drink, but around 1600 Pope Clement VIII is reported to have so enjoyed a cup that he said it would be wrong to permit Muslims to monopolise it, and so he declared he would Baptise it. By 1630 it had reached France, and together with tea was drunk more for novelty value. All this changed in 1650.
[14:14:26]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : How does one baptise coffee?
[14:14:38]  Magda Kamenev French press?
[14:14:49]  engacia: pour holy water over the beans
[14:14:49]  Cherie Harcassle: dunking it in water
[14:14:56]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : I assume the same way a Jewish person or a Muslim person makes something Kosher or Halal, by saying a prayer over it.
[14:15:17]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : I like Fraulein Engacia's idea.
[14:15:22]  Wulfriðe Blitzen laughs
[14:15:32]  Jedburgh Dagger : or dunk a sinner in it
[14:15:32]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Certainly would like to have been a fly on the wall that day
[14:15:39]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : England was a Protectorate after a long Civil War and  run on Puritan lines. Alcohol was frowned upon. Partying was banned, fun was sinful, plays had been stopped. Even Christmas was outlawed.  London’s coffee craze began in 1652 when Pasqua Rosée, the Greek servant of a coffee-loving British Levant merchant, opened London’s first coffeehouse (or rather, coffee shack) against the stone wall of St Michael’s churchyard in a labyrinth of alleys off Cornhill. Coffee was a smash hit; within a couple of years, Pasqua was selling over 600 dishes of coffee a day to the horror of the local tavern keepers. For anyone who’s ever tried seventeenth-century style coffee, this can come as something of a shock — unless, that is, you like your brew “black as hell, strong as death, sweet as love”, as an old Turkish proverb recommends, and shot through with grit.
[14:16:12]  Magda Kamenev  grins. "I love that phrase."
[14:16:16]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  smiles
[14:16:27]  Jedburgh Dagger : and how I take mine
[14:16:48]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : I prefer mine strong enough to dissolve spoons
[14:16:58]  ZiggyFritz laughs.
[14:17:00]  Zantabraxus : (and tooth enamel)
[14:17:13]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Saying that to a Barista is always good fun.
[14:17:20]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : It’s not just that our tastebuds have grown more discerning accustomed as we are to silky-smooth Flat Whites; contemporaries found it disgusting too. One early sampler likened it to a “syrup of soot and the essence of old shoes” while others were reminded of oil, ink, soot, mud, damp and shit. Nonetheless, people loved how the “bitter Mohammedan gruel”, as The London Spy described it in 1701, kindled conversations, fired debates, sparked ideas and, as Pasqua himself pointed out in his handbill The Virtue of the Coffee Drink (1652), made one “fit for business” — his stall was a stone’s throw from that great entrepôt of international commerce, the Royal Exchange.
[14:17:29]  Anna Mynx : I actually don't like coffee,although I love the smell of it.
[14:18:04]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Here's a copy of the world's oldest coffee advertisement
[14:18:06]  Lady Sumoku: Sacrelidge!
[14:18:25]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : See how it cures all ills! It helps you think!  :p
[14:18:35]  ZiggyFritz: Sacrebrew!
[14:18:43]  Cherie Harcassle: giggles
[14:18:48]  Lady Sumoku: It helps me think "why is everything moving so much?"
[14:19:08]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Remember — until the mid-seventeenth century, most people in England were either slightly — or very — drunk all of the time. Drink London’s fetid river water at your own peril; most people wisely favoured watered-down ale or beer (“small beer”). The arrival of coffee, then, triggered a dawn of sobriety that laid the foundations for truly spectacular economic growth in the decades that followed as people thought clearly for the first time. The stock exchange, insurance industry, and auctioneering: all burst into life in 17th-century coffeehouses — in Jonathan’s, Lloyd’s, and Garraway’s — spawning the credit, security, and markets that facilitated the dramatic expansion of Britain’s network of global trade in Asia, Africa and America.
[14:19:28]  engacia grins wickedly
[14:19:36]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach  snickers quietly
[14:19:41]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : No respectable women would have been seen dead in a coffeehouse. It wasn’t long before wives became frustrated at the amount of time their husbands were idling away “deposing princes, settling the bounds of kingdoms, and balancing the power of Europe with great justice and impartiality”, as Richard Steele put it in the Tatler, all from the comfort of a fireside bench. In 1674, years of simmering resentment erupted into the volcano of fury that was the Women’s Petition Against Coffee. The fair sex lambasted the “Excessive use of that Newfangled, Abominable, Heathenish Liquor called COFFEE” which, as they saw it, had reduced their virile industrious men into effeminate, babbling, French layabouts. Retaliation was swift and acerbic in the form of the vulgar Men’s Answer to the Women’s Petition Against Coffee, which claimed it was “base adulterate wine” and “muddy ale” that made men impotent. Coffee, in fact, was the Viagra of the day, making “the erection more vigorous, the ejaculation more full, add[ing] a spiritual ascendency to the sperm”.
[14:19:51]  Jimmy Branagh sneaks in silently, unnoticed
[14:20:02]  ZiggyFritz: No he doesn't...
[14:20:26]  engacia laughs
[14:20:34]  Erehwon Texeira  blinks slowly
[14:20:47]  Zantabraxus : Jimmy, Erehwon *smiles*
[14:20:48]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : In London you can actually buy coffee mugs with a copy of the Woman's Petition printed on it...
[14:20:50]  Cherie Harcassle: hehe an ascendency!
[14:21:02]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : By the dawn of the eighteenth century, contemporaries were counting between 1,000 and 8,000 coffeehouses in the capital even if a street survey conducted in 1734 (which excluded unlicensed premises) counted only 551. Even so, Europe had never seen anything like it. Protestant Amsterdam, a rival hub of international trade, could only muster 32 coffeehouses by 1700 and the cluster of coffeehouses in St Mark’s Square in Venice were forbidden from seating more than five customers (presumably to stifle the coalescence of public opinion) whereas North’s, in Cheapside, could happily seat 90 people.
[14:21:35]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : The walls of Don Saltero’s Chelsea coffeehouse were festooned with taxidermy monsters including crocodiles, turtles and rattlesnakes, which local gentlemen scientists like Sir Isaac Newton and Sir Hans Sloane liked to discuss over coffee; at White’s on St James’s Street, famously depicted by Hogarth, rakes would gamble away entire estates and place bets on how long customers had to live, a practice that would eventually grow into the life insurance industry; at Lunt’s in Clerkenwell Green, patrons could sip coffee, have a haircut and enjoy a fiery lecture on the abolition of slavery given by its barber-proprietor John Gale Jones; at John Hogarth’s Latin Coffeehouse, also in Clerkenwell, patrons were encouraged to converse in the Latin tongue at all times (it didn’t last long); at Moll King’s brothel-coffeehouse, depicted by Hogarth, libertines could sober up and peruse a directory of harlots, before being led to the requisite brothel nearby. There was even a floating coffeehouse, the Folly of the Thames, moored outside Somerset House where fops and rakes danced the night away on her rain-spattered deck.
[14:22:10]  Jedburgh Dagger : Wilkes drank coffee
[14:22:13]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Despite this colourful diversity, early coffeehouses all followed the same blueprint, maximising the interaction between customers and forging a creative, convivial environment. They emerged as smoky candlelit forums for commercial transactions, spirited debate, and the exchange of information, ideas, and lies.
[14:22:35]  engacia: :)
[14:22:51]  Erehwon Texeira : summons a cup of coffee and listens.
[14:22:52]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Here's an early coffee cup - you may recognise it more as a rice bowl
[14:23:14]  ZiggyFritz: Sounds like my kind of place.
[14:23:42]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Customers sat around long communal tables strewn with every type of media imaginable listening in to each other's conversations, interjecting whenever they pleased, and reflecting upon the newspapers. Talking to strangers, an alien concept in most coffee shops today, was actively encouraged. Dudley Ryder, a young law student from Hackney and shameless social climber, kept a diary in 1715-16, in which he routinely recalled marching into a coffeehouse, sitting down next to a stranger, and discussing the latest news. Private boxes and booths did begin to appear from the late 1740s but before that it was nigh-on impossible to hold a genuinely private conversation in a coffeehouse.
[14:24:20]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : As each new customer went in, they’d be assailed by cries of “What news have you?” or more formally, “Your servant, sir, what news from Tripoli?” or, if you were in the Latin Coffeehouse, “Quid Novi!” That coffeehouses functioned as post-boxes for many customers reinforced this news-gathering function. Unexpectedly wide-ranging discussions could be twined from a single conversational thread as when, at John’s coffeehouse in 1715, news about the execution of a rebel Jacobite Lord (as recorded by Dudley Ryder) transmogrified into a discourse on “the ease of death by beheading” with one participant telling of an experiment he’d conducted slicing a viper in two and watching in amazement as both ends slithered off in different directions. Was this, as some of the company conjectured, proof of the existence of two consciousnesses?
[14:24:31]  Magda Kamenev is still processing 'a spiritual ascendency to the sperm" ...
[14:24:39]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : laughs
[14:25:08]  engacia: wots so funny about the truth?
[14:25:36]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : The person who wrote it had a sense of humour. Its quite a good read
[14:26:03]  engacia: o
[14:26:35]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : His last comment was 'We are driven to the coffee house to escape the insufferable din of your wagging tongues!'
[14:26:53]  Lady Sumoku gasps
[14:26:56]  Jedburgh Dagger : Boswell's London Diary is another good one
[14:27:09]  Magda Kamenev : She didn't mean you, Lady.
[14:27:15]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Pfft!
[14:27:33]  Erehwon Texeira : So, London's coffee houses were the Reddit and Hacker News of the day? Tedious boy's clubs?
[14:27:41]  Lady Sumoku: I'm not so sure. :P
[14:27:46]  Erehwon Texeira  grins and sips her coffeee.
[14:27:49]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : In the 17thc there was a habit to pay for things in kind with trading tokens, a hang up from the English Civil War.
[14:28:04]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : An IOU if you will
[14:28:37]  Magda Kamenev adds a touch more sugar to her coffee pot and lights the camp stove.
[14:28:38]  Lady Sumoku: I don't think many on Reddit or the like would stand for actual physical coexistence in the same room.
[14:28:39]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Some 19thc American tokens use 17thc terms  such as 'good for one drink
[14:29:01]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Coffee houses spawned newspapers, some which still exist today.  A man would enter the building, pay a penny to a 'Comptroller' who would hand him a bowl, which consisted mostly of Chinese ricebowls in the early days because being so similar in shape to tea cups from China (and not being rice eaters) it was deemed to be for coffee. This shape is still echoes in the modern coffee cup today. The cup was held in a certain way to prevent burn fingers, a saucer was provided so you didn't spill a drop and could slurp the dregs noisily while in conversation. A jar labelled 'TIPS' (To Insure Prompt Service', although some sources dispute this is what it meant) was left at the counter, and a little extra would get you a clay pipe and some tobacco. A serving boy would then come over to fill your cup from an army of coffeepots boiling by the fire. Each house specialised in their own added flavours, and experiments began with filters (its recorded that old socks were used for this purpose, even fish skin...yuk).
[14:29:55]  ZiggyFritz: Yikes!
[14:30:12]  Erehwon Texeira : They could had come to Mondrago and asked us how to make coffee.
[14:30:18]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Although this father and daughter are drinking tea, they are holding the cups the same way as for coffee and for hot chocolate
[14:31:26]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : As coffee houses encouraged debate on the matters of the day (lets call them a 17thc Facebook) it was common for fights to break out.
[14:31:44]  Stereo Nacht: Interesting... Similar to Japanese'handling of tea cups...
[14:31:58]  Lady Sumoku: And not at all because of a day soaking in caffeine.
[14:32:32]  Zantabraxus  will have to sample coffee in Mondrago again
[14:32:34]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : If you look carefully, while the serving boys carry on as if nothing is happening a rowdy debate is taking place
[14:32:41]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Someone is throwing coffee at another man
[14:33:04]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : My favourite illustration has a serving girl hitting someone over the head with a ladle
[14:33:10]  Lady Sumoku: Maybe it tastes too much of sock, and not enough of fish.
[14:33:19]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Sadly I couldn't source a clear version of that one for tonight
[14:33:19]  ZiggyFritz: Lol.
[14:33:35]  Jedburgh Dagger : all depends on whose socks.
[14:33:42]  Magda Kamenev  punctures her tin of boiled milk and pour it in a cup, topping it off with the boiled coffee, grounds and all.
[14:33:44]  Cherie Harcassle: extra fish was a special order, cost extra
[14:34:11]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : I've actually made and served 17thc style coffee using a recipe from the coffee house owned by the most famous mistress of Charles II, Nell Gwyn
[14:34:16]  ZiggyFritz: The scales helped erode the tooth enamel.
[14:34:26]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : She added orange rinds and spices
[14:34:32]  engacia: mmmm
[14:34:46]  Anna Mynx : that actually sounds good.
[14:34:55]  Anna Mynx : how did it taste?
[14:35:01]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : It was boiled for a long time, so a crust formed. Akin to Egyptian Ibrik coffee pots
[14:35:02]  Zantabraxus : It does.
[14:35:06]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Actually it was very nice
[14:35:32]  Jedburgh Dagger : I have a friend on the reenacting circuit who uses Turkish pots
[14:35:33]  Anna Mynx : do you have a link to the recipe?
[14:35:58]  Erehwon Texeira : mmm, Turkish coffee with milk and caradmon
[14:36:28]  engacia: mm mm  MM

[14:36:52]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Not on me right now as I had it given to me by someone at the Royal Palaces at Greenwich a few years ago, But its easy to make. Add your favourite coffee mix, and on the top place a teaspoon of orange peel, and a pinch of nutmeg
[14:37:18]  Magda Kamenev sips her coffee, unable to suppress a shudder of delight.
[14:37:23]  Anna Mynx : thank you
[14:37:25]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : It tastes best brewed in a stove pot espresso pot, I found.
[14:37:51]  Jedburgh Dagger : Moka!
[14:37:57]  ZiggyFritz sips his cold, black coffee.
[14:37:59]  engacia: my dad introduced me to heavily milked down, sweetened coffee poured over bread behind my mom's back
[14:38:00]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Sadly the coffeehouse was not to last in England. By the late 18thc privacy, snobbery and private clubs began to dominate the social scene. Coffeehouses went into decline, some converted to tea, a new cheaper import partly encouraged by the British government who had begun to fight for the domination of the Eastern import markets. Tea, once drunk by the upper classes suddenly became cheaper than coffee, and was easy to buy around the country.
[14:38:33]  engacia: needless to say, my dad became my supplier
[14:38:54]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Twinings started life as a coffee house - he found tea sold more and founded his now famous company
[14:39:34]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : I hope you can see the details in this next image
[14:39:55]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Its called 'Tom and Jerry at a Coffee Shop'
[14:40:10]  engacia: :)
[14:40:51]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : This is the Regency period. By now the wealthy dared each other to visit coffee houses for entertainment, as a 'good fight' could always be witnessed between people in a fierce debate
[14:40:56]  Magda Kamenev: I don't see a cat or a mouse in that print.
[14:41:07]  Wulfriðe Blitzen   grins
[14:41:10]  Cherie Harcassle: They look like Darcy and Bingley
[14:41:20]  Stereo Nacht: Heh. Right! :-D
[14:41:27]  Lady Sumoku assumes Tom and Jerry are the two snooty snobs that don't look like they're there for coffee.
[14:41:45]  Erehwon Texeira : Maybe Darcy assumed a name for when he went out and about in London.
[14:42:04]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Notice something else in the image - Africans
[14:42:37]  Magda Kamenev : Ah!
[14:42:49]  Lady Sumoku thought they were just average Babbagers covered in soot.
[14:42:52]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : In London at this time Africans were free. There was a large community. Sometimes they ended up running coffeehouses by the dockside
[14:42:55]  Jimmy Branagh: Me too!
[14:43:00]  Jedburgh Dagger : it's a Cruikshank!
[14:43:06]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : One is a sweep, but the lady by the fire is African
[14:43:23]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : The other lady cooking crumpets seems to be in mid debate
[14:43:59]  engacia: is that right, eh?
[14:44:04]  Lady Sumoku: Or a ramble, she doesn't look like she's open for discussion.
[14:44:04]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : It depends on who you talk to, some people call her Indian, some just call her 'unwashed'
[14:44:06]  Erehwon Texeira : there seem to be cups and saucers flying in the background
[14:44:20]  Wulfriðe Blitzen   nods
[14:44:51]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Indeed, after 150 years, people were still fiercely debating politics and the affairs of the day. Like Facebook, others begged to disagree with your opinion
[14:45:09]  ZiggyFritz: Thank you for answering my question about what the lady was toasting, before I asked, Miss Blitzen. Lol.
[14:45:15]  Wulfriðe Blitzen laughs
[14:45:28]  Jedburgh Dagger : harder to block dissenting opinions
[14:45:46]  Lady Sumoku: I thought they were just sanitizing socks for the next batch.
[14:45:55]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach chuckles
[14:45:59]  ZiggyFritz: Oh my Goddess. Lol.
[14:46:00]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : While the coffee shop declined in England to a few small pockets, it thrived in France and Austria, where it began to become an art form
[14:46:27]  engacia: ye, those brits couldnt hold their coffee
[14:46:29]  Anna Mynx : And thus, Starbucks was born
[14:46:39]  ZiggyFritz: Ewww.
[14:46:40]  Lady Sumoku: Or whelped.
[14:46:43]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Here's a Parisian coffeehouse, around 1850's.
[14:47:00]  engacia: much more orderly
[14:47:15]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : You can see they are still debating and discussing the news of the day
[14:47:17]  ZiggyFritz: More's the pity.
[14:47:22]  engacia: the french were always more refined
[14:47:23]  Lady Sumoku: The tiny tables were probably so you couldn't stand on them for your arguments.
[14:47:33]  ZiggyFritz: Lol.
[14:47:45]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : The man at the back on the extreme left may have just run out of coffee
[14:47:54]  engacia: lol!  ye!
[14:48:03]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Or intently reading. Or both
[14:48:04]  Lady Sumoku: Or realized he left his purse at home.
[14:48:06]  Erehwon Texeira : my regular coffee house has some tiny tables so people don't camp with their laptops
[14:48:16]  Cherie Harcassle: “black as hell, strong as death, sweet as love, with a pretty design on top in the cream!"
[14:48:25]  Erehwon Texeira : or just learned that Homestuck was ending.
[14:48:26]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  laughs
[14:48:34]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : My local one puts stars on the cream
[14:48:44]  Cherie Harcassle: pretty!
[14:48:46]  ZiggyFritz: The man far mid right resembles a lion.
[14:48:50]  engacia: sugar stars?
[14:49:08]  Lady Sumoku: Cocoa powder
[14:49:15]  engacia: ah
[14:49:18]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : As it declined, it increased in countries like France and America. It is said the French Revolution began in a Parisian coffee house as the state of the royal family was much debated. In America political change and high taxes resulting in the Boston Teaparty made an entire nation look elsewhere for a new national drink. Coffee found a new niche.
[14:49:40]  Stereo Nacht: Too bad I don't drink coffee (what am I doing here? X-D ) or I might be interested in cocoa on coffee... ;-)
[14:50:10]  Lady Sumoku: You could spoon off the cocoa-foam and leave the coffee leftovers.
[14:50:11]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Cocoa has an interesting history too. Not sure if you can brave a talk about that so soon after this
[14:50:36]  Stereo Nacht: It gets pricy for just a bit of cocoa...
[14:50:41]  Erehwon Texeira : Now I want to see a version of "Non-Stop" where Hamilton's in the background, with an AeroPress, as Burr laments over his industry.
[14:50:48]  engacia: who cares from which bean we derive our beloved caffeine?
[14:51:30]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Now this is one for the coffee monsters in the room
[14:51:38]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : A disease-stricken Arabica coffee plant next to a towering Liberica
[14:51:48] : pricey?  cocoa?  at about 6$ for 500 grams of pure powder?
[14:51:56]  engacia: *snorts a line*
[14:52:05]  ZiggyFritz guffaws
[14:52:09]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Liberica is the little known 'third' strain of coffee. There is a reason we do not see it in coffee houses though.
[14:52:38]  Lady Sumoku: Obviously it is grown from grapefruits.
[14:52:50]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  chuckles
[14:52:52]  ZiggyFritz: Low yield?
[14:53:06]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Liberica was lost to science
[14:53:13]  engacia: !
[14:53:15]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : But found again by Kew Garden experts
[14:53:20]  engacia: !!
[14:53:23]  ZiggyFritz: Oh my.
[14:53:33]  Stereo Nacht: Oh? What follish mad scientist deprived future generation of a subject of experimentation?
[14:53:34]  Cherie Harcassle: on the third shelf on the far left?
[14:53:52]  engacia: prince charles again?
[14:53:56]  Magda Kamenev : Did the civet cats eat all of the Liberica beans?
[14:54:01]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : They discovered a load of 19thc paperwork by English colonials raving about the bean, so they set out to see a genus in the mountains all over Yemen and Ethiopia
[14:54:01]  Erehwon Texeira : does it make lousy coffee, like robusta?
[14:54:27]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Just as they were about to give up and list it as extinct, they found it!
[14:54:41]  Anna Mynx  cheers
[14:54:45]  ZiggyFritz: There is no lousy coffee.
[14:54:56]  Lady Sumoku: Just "challenging?"
[14:55:01]  Cherie Harcassle: I trust that they're growing it ?
[14:55:09]  ZiggyFritz: Yay for exploraters!
[14:55:37]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Well apparently they tried to get it as a replacement for the Arabica when it began to be threatened by the 'leaf rust' the modern plants are also threatened with
[14:56:04]  Wulfriðe Blitzen: When it was tasted, they wrote: "Liberica is a strong grower and a prolific cropper but it just doesn't taste very good, and for many tastes a bit like vegetable soup"
[14:56:22]  ZiggyFritz: I like vegetable soup...
[14:56:41]  engacia: it lacks the kick
[14:56:43]  Stereo Nacht: Heh. That's one I could be conviced to taste... ;-)
[14:56:51]  Cherie Harcassle: not enough fish scales, obviously
[14:56:57]  ZiggyFritz: It kicks the lack.
[14:57:08]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : We may see them experiment with cross breeding, as they are very concerned that with global warming Arabica will vanish. Its a very fussy plant - too warm, it burns, too cold, it doesn't grow beans. It prefers altitude.
[14:57:51]  Lady Sumoku: Altitude without attitude
[14:58:01]  engacia: have you seen the size of commercial greenhouses these days?
[14:58:04]  ZiggyFritz: But with altitude, comes coolness.
[14:58:12]  Magda Kamenev : Let the coffee soar ...
[14:58:19]  Cherie Harcassle: a planty paradox!
[14:58:21]  Stereo Nacht: Bah. Just migrate the plants as temperature changes... Current fields will disappear, others will become available...
[14:58:21]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : People have tried to grow it in their homes, but only succeed with Robustica. But the plant takes years to mature before you can get your first proper crop.
[14:58:46]  engacia: excellent point, miss nacht!
[14:58:50]  Stereo Nacht: Start planting now, then! ;-)
[14:59:04]  Stereo Nacht: Ahem. Sorry.
[14:59:13]  Jimmy Branagh chuckles
[14:59:32]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Last image for the evening. A lady in Ethiopia serves coffee. Notice the cups
[14:59:46]  Lady Sumoku: Thimbles!
[14:59:49]  ZiggyFritz: More like rice bowls...
[14:59:57]  Jimmy Branagh: That looks tasty
[15:00:02]  Cherie Harcassle: they get a deal on them from China
[15:00:08]  ZiggyFritz: Lol.
[15:00:11]  Stereo Nacht: The cups are nice, but I really like the coffee pot!
[15:00:13]  Magda Kamenev : I really want to do a Ethiopian coffee ceremony one day.
[15:00:19]  ZiggyFritz: All the lead you can choke on.
[15:00:25]  Jimmy Branagh: Oy loikes me coffee black.  Black as midnoight on a moonless noight.
[15:00:27]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : They consume much of their own coffee before it even leaves the country, and are proud of their national drink
[15:01:12]  ZiggyFritz: I like the pot as well, Miss Nacht.
[15:01:13]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : So does nothing taste as good as Arabica? "Coffea stenophylla, sometimes known as the highland coffee of Sierra Leone, is supposed to be incredible," says Schilling. Drunk locally, in 1896 it was described by Kew as one of the two species of coffee which could "prove a formidable rival of the Arabian coffee" - the other was Liberica. Who knows, if the British had opted for C stenophylla instead, what coffee would taste like today.
[15:01:38]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : I added the last from a quote, but I thought it was pertinent
[15:01:51]  Erehwon Texeira : mmm, Ethiopian coffees are so good
[15:02:00]  Stereo Nacht: "Incredible" can mean as much "good" as "atrocious"... ;-)
[15:02:10]  ZiggyFritz: Lol.
[15:02:14]  Lady Sumoku: "Unbelievable"
[15:02:28]  Erehwon Texeira  "Inconceivable!"
[15:02:33]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : I shall end the talk here, but if you have any questions, please ask :)
[15:02:44]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach applauds
[15:02:45]  Jimmy Branagh applauds
[15:02:47]  Anna Mynx : Thank you for this discussion
[15:02:49]  Magda Kamenev  cheers!
[15:02:52]  Anna Mynx : It was lots of fun
[15:02:54]  Anna Mynx  :)
[15:02:54]  Stereo Nacht:  `*.¸.*´ APPLAUSE `*.¸.*´APPLAUSE `*.¸.*´
[15:02:57]  Magda Kamenev drinks some more coffee.
[15:02:58]  ZiggyFritz: Huzzah!
[15:03:00]  Zantabraxus applauds
[15:03:03]  Cherie Harcassle: Thank you Wulfroe!
[15:03:07]  Jimmy Branagh: I will make a fresh pot
[15:03:28]  Erehwon Texeira : I need to learn more about coffee in North Africa the Mediterranean.
[15:03:29]  ZiggyFritz: Thank you very much. That was entertaining.
[15:03:35]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Thank you :D I hope you take a new look at the coffee section when you next go shopping. And stick to Arabica, Robusta is bleh
[15:03:40]  engacia: applauds!  very, very informative, interesting and intriguing !!!  thank you, thank you, thank you!!
[15:03:43]  Magda Kamenev : Thank you so much, Mrs. Blitzen!
[15:04:24]  Erehwon Texeira : And don't forget that most of the coffee you drink in Babbage comes through Mondrago.
[15:04:39]  Jimmy Branagh: I have to run.  Thenks Miss Wulfy!  Byee awl!
[15:04:39]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : Fraiu Gräfin, which bean is it that is processed by cats' digestive systems?
[15:05:06]  Erehwon Texeira: thank you, Wulfie!
[15:05:06]  Zantabraxus smiles
[15:05:26]  Lady Sumoku: Not exactly a cat.
[15:05:40]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : ah!  Civet cat coffee. Apparently its a secret favourite of Prince Charles, so people get him a pack of it when they want to curry favour with him
[15:05:41]  Lady Sumoku: Kopi Luwak
[15:05:49]  Magda Kamenev laughs. It is rather expensive.
[15:06:12]  Erehwon Texeira : civets are more like raccoons, aren't they?
[15:06:24]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : With which bean variety does it start?
[15:07:39]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : I believe its Arabica for the cat. But then, how many people would confess they pick up after jungle cats with a poop collector?
[15:07:48]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach chuckles
[15:08:08]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Their stomach acids are supposed to change the chemical signature of the bean. I have never tried it, but a coffee house in London sells it for £10 a cup.
[15:09:25]  Erehwon Texeira : I wish I had time to visit more coffee houses in London
[15:09:49]  Lady Sumoku: Wikipedia says it started because the Dutch landowners wouldn't let the the natives have any coffee beans, saving it all for export.
[15:09:56]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : One of the original 17thc coffee houses still survives - its now...a Starbucks...
[15:10:07]  Erehwon Texeira : all I manged was a Costa on Edgware Road.
[15:10:13]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Hum, Costo is...eew.
[15:10:30]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : That was bad?
[15:10:48]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : Costa is very bitter, they use a bland Robustica
[15:10:49]  Lady Sumoku: Costa is still better than Starbucks!
[15:11:16]  Magda Kamenev grins.
[15:12:25]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : And now in London you can actually visit 'hipster' coffee houses who brew coffee in Victorian Vacuum coffee makers
[15:12:43]  Anna Mynx : wow
[15:13:16]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : The Japanese brew their coffee that way, because they feel it gets the flavour of the bean much more distinctly
[15:13:28]  Magda Kamenev: I look forward to seeing how Starbucks' introduction to Milan goes.
[15:13:44]  Lady Sumoku: It could be the start of WWIII
[15:13:46]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Heh yes, that's had a few Italians over here scowl in disguste
[15:14:22]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Let me link you the machine, maybe you have seen them
[15:14:57]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-d2IVU4MDnqY/TzCwZAgDbwI/AAAAAAABo0Y/-5UHelTGxBI/s720/e5gtrwqefdsfdsfsdfsdf.jpg
[15:15:00]  Erehwon Texeira: Yes, the vacuum ones! Blue Bottle at the old Mint has them.
[15:15:32]  Magda Kamenev : There's a coffee chain here that displays them, but almost never uses them.
[15:15:38]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : I love watching those ones as they process the coffee, they make a pleasing click
[15:16:16]  Erehwon Texeira : of course, now that summer's here, I'm ready for cold brew!
[15:16:51]  Lady Sumoku: About Kopi Luwak: Tim Carman, food writer for the Washington Post reviewed kopi luwak available to US consumers and concluded "It tasted just like...Folgers. Stale. Lifeless. Petrified dinosaur droppings steeped in bathtub water. I couldn't finish it."
[15:17:06]  Magda Kamenev: Oh ... the Victorian vacuums remind me of Japanese siphon brewing.
[15:17:32]  Lady Sumoku: Same thing.
[15:17:51]  Magda Kamenev : Only more glass, less copper?
[15:17:53]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Their pots are beginning to catch on in the UK
[15:18:08]  Lady Sumoku: Well same "idea."  Just different setup.
[15:18:30]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : Recently they dared to say coffee now is the most popular drink in the UK. Its so bad that the large tea companies like Twinnings are looking at new ways to sell tea
[15:19:16]  Wulfriðe Blitzen  : So there's now a flood of trendy teas of obscure and odd flavours
[15:19:17]  Baron Klaus Wulfenbach : Tragic.
[15:19:56]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : I have a box of Jasmin and coconut tea, and Jasmin, lavender and chamomile tea for instance.
[15:20:12]  Zantabraxus : Such an awful thing to be inundated with
[15:20:14]  Zantabraxus  grins
[15:20:46]  Wulfriðe Blitzen : I still prefer the original Jasmin tea, with the opening flowers. You place the tea, and a tightly coiled dried pod into a cup, and pour on boiling water. The flower opens slowly.
[15:22:33]  Zantabraxus : Ah, somewhere about I have flowering teas- brewed in a glass teapot to enjoy watching them open as they steep.
[15:22:47]  Wulfriðe Blitzen: They are lovely
[15:22:49]  Erehwon Texeira : yes
[15:23:03]  Erehwon Texeira : and green tea with jasmine is wonderful iced
[15:23:05]  Magda Kamenev : Jasmine is perfectly fine on its own.

Æther Salon - Asylums! (Edited Transcript)

Most of you know me as Beryl Strifeclaw.  I keep the asylum here in New Babbage afloat when I'm not off on some insane quest or other unexpected madness.

Let me begin this by saying how this journey began for me and the reason that I began taking an interest in asylums and mental hospitals, long before I joined SL. It had nothing to do with a fascination with the past.  I met someone who actually worked in a hospital treating those in need.  I would soon learn something from them that you aren't going to see in a history book or a newspaper.

Everyone probably has or had a friend, or at least seen depicted on TV, where someone cannot stand how their profession is depicted on screen.  Real lawyers who hate how slimey they are represented, Doctors who despise being compared to their television actors (Patch Adams), Cheerleaders as the brainless bullies, and soldiers complain the truth is never accurately depicted. My friend had similar complaints about mental institutions, except theirs was that in all forms of media the asylum or hospital was never there to actually help anyone.  It was always a backdrop for some twisted location where no one listened, people experimented uncarringly upon patients, or delighted in torturing their victims.

To them every asylum or mental hospital represented in stories was always the backdrop of a 'torture porn' where those who worked there had no redeeming qualities at all.  The most recent examples of these I've spoken to them about was American Horror Story: Asylum and the psychiatrist in American Horror Story: Murder House. She despised both of these depictions as it only further serves the negative perception in the public mind toward mental health facilities.  The worst part for her was when the psychiatrist in Murder House called therapy a sick joke and no one was ever helped by it. She found that offensive to everything she represented. Often when people speak of mental hospitals and asylums this picture of torment and torture is brought to mind first.  Sadly it is just another thing, like the social stigma and mockery surrounding medication or needing therapy, that adds to the anxiety that make many people forgo the help that they could get.There is no getting around that terrible things happened in these places, and the manner of their corruptions might still surprise you.

However, if you take nothing else out of this, I hope it will be to realize that there are still people working in these facilities, which have much better practices today than even twenty years ago.  For every uncaring individual wanting their pay-check, or corrupt practitioners, there are people who want to help those in need and nothing I say today should stop you from seeking them out.
With that said lets go back to the earliest asylums...

In 872, Ahmad ibn Tulun built a hospital in Cairo that provided care to the insane, which included music therapy.  Bimaristans were Islamic institutions that were later described by European travellers who wrote about their wonder at the care and kindness shown to 'lunatics'. Despite this medical historians would say, "They were a drop in the ocean for the vast population that they had to serve, and their true function lay in highlighting ideals of compassion and bringing together the activities of the medical profession."  (Roy Porter 1997 The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity)

In Europe during the medieval era, the 'mad' were housed in a variety of settings. Monasteries, towers (fools' towers), hospitals and more. The ancient Parisian hospital Hôtel-Dieu also had a small number of cells set aside for lunatics, whilst the town of Elbing boasted a madhouse, the Tollhaus, attached to the Teutonic Knights' hospital. Dave Sheppard's Development of Mental Health Law and Practice began in 1285 with a case that linked "the instigation of the devil" with being "frantic and mad". The level of provision for the care and control of the insane remained extremely limited at the turn of the 18th century. Madness was seen as a domestic problem, with families and parish authorities central to regimens of care. Parish authorities would often provide financial support, the provision of parish nurses and, where family care was not possible, lunatics might be 'boarded out' to other members of the local community or committed to private madhouses or workhouses.

In the late 17th century, this model began to change, and privately run asylums for the insane began to proliferate and expand in size. Already in 1632 it was recorded that Bethlem Royal Hospital, London had "below stairs a parlor, a kitchen, two larders, a long entry throughout the house, and 21 rooms wherein the poor distracted people lie, and above the stairs eight rooms more for servants and the poor to lie in".  (Allderidge, Patricia 1979 Management and Mismanagement at Bedlam). Inmates who were deemed dangerous or disturbing were chained, but Bethlem was an otherwise free roaming building. Its inhabitants could wander around its confines and possibly throughout the general neighborhood in which the hospital was situated.  In 1676, Bethlem expanded into newly built premises at Moorfields with a capacity for 100 inmates. Practices such as leeching the patients and restraints such as the 'Tranquilizer chair' were used during this era.

This, is the tranquillizer chair. The idea was that they couldn't see, hear or otherwise get any stimulation. The bucket was for what you think it was for. The mad were more likely to go more insane in these conditions. But that was because they weren't interested in treating the patients. Privately run asylums quickly got a reputation for caring more about profits than care for their patients.  The August 19, 1858 edition of The Times printed an editorial about three cases of wrongful confinement. The editor used those accounts, which were filled with detailed descriptions of greed and corruption leading to these confinements revealed the subpar regulations in place. People were bribing doctors to wrongfully commit relatives in order to receive their inheritances early among other things.

According to the editor any man or woman could, without much difficulty, be incarcerated in a Private Lunatic Asylum when fully within the realm of reason.  Private asylums like these would have been employed by the upper class, as they were expensive, but in the case of inheritance it was sometimes worth the cost. The corruption went further.  Sometimes Asylum directors were bribed to ensure better care was given to one specific patient. Someone who wanted to lock up their sister or mother but ensure nothing bad happened to them.  The fear of abuse made the Doctors even more influential because even judges and politicians had to use their services for members of their family.

By failing to place a relative who was thought to be insane or problematic to the status quo into an asylum, families were opening up the possibilities of “immediate danger, disgraceful scenes, and exposures” to the public and ruining their family image. (Monroe, Henry Articles on Reform in Private Asylums. Deviance, Disorder, and the Self.) In this era where your image was everything, incarcerating anyone who shamed your family on the surface was important to your own welfare. There were asylums for 'hysterical women' and 'drunkards' and women who were guilty of 'infidelity'.  Here are just a few things that could get one involuntarily committed:  Insanity caused by anxiety, Epilepsy,  Insanity caused by childbirth, Insanity caused by overwork, depression, inebriation, and infidelity (known as 'Moral Insanity')

Even their opinions were enough to get women incarcerated.  The men who were in charge of these women, either a husband, father, or brother, could send women to mental institutions stating that they believed that these women were mentally ill because of their strong opinions.  Between the years of 1850-1900, women were placed in mental institutions for behaving in ways the male society did not agree with. "These men had the last say when it came to the mental health of these women, so if they believed that these women were mentally ill, or if they simply wanted to silence the voices and opinions of these women, they could easily send them to mental institutions. This was an easy way to render them vulnerable and submissive."  (Packard, E.P. (1873). Modern persecution, or, Insane asylums unveiled as demonstrated by the report of the Investigating Committee of the Legislature of Illinois.)

However, not everyone was corrupt.  And even the corrupt ones did not stand in the way as things were changing for the better as the world was getting ready for Sigmund Freud's theories.  Even decades before his studies into psychotherapy things were becoming more humane during the Enlightenment and 'Optimistic' asylum periods. Attitudes towards the mentally ill began to change. It came to be viewed as a disorder that required compassionate treatment that would aid in the rehabilitation of the victim. When the ruling monarch of the United Kingdom George III, who suffered from a mental disorder, experienced a remission in 1789, mental illness came to be seen as something which could be treated and cured.

Therapeutic Optimism in asylums ran from about 1830 to around 1860 and were at its height in the 1840s. Asylums built under the 1808 and 1828 County Asylums Act tended to be left to the management of doctors. As the theories and techniques of managing lunatics in asylums developed, so did the belief that this asylum treatment itself was the correct, scientific way to cure 'lunacy'. Signs of the therapeutic change can be seen in the changing legislation. The 1828 Madhouses Act, unlike the 1774 Act, was concerned about conditions in asylums. These included the 'moral conditions'. Official visitors were required to inquire about the performance of divine service and its effects. In 1832, this inquiry was extended to include "what description of employment, amusement or recreation (if any) is provided". This was not much, but it was a start.

In May 1839 John Connolly visited Lincoln Asylum where Robert Gardiner Hill had abolished mechanical restraint of patients in a small asylum. On appointment to Hanwell, Connolly proceeded to abolish it in a large asylum. Several English asylums were practising non-restraint by 1844. Doctors were already recognizing that chains and restraints were worsening the patients conditions instead of helping them recover.  To paraphrase the friend I mentioned at the beginning, 'because real life isn't a horror story where doctors are soulless monsters, they did what scientists are supposed to do and changed their practices to fit the science.'

Iron chains, mercury pills, and Tranquillizer chairs were being abandoned for more humane treatments and eventually most were discontinued completely in the 1850's as a failed experiment along with bleeding the patients. Outdated treatments, there were many: Instead they began to utilize actions and the freedom to move around their tiny rooms.  When left with nothing to do but live in the tiny space patients often went mad even when they were sane before but activities were being introduced.  Painting, reading, and game activities. So while you might have found devices like the tranquilizer chair in the old asylum in Babbage, the Dunsany, it was considered archaic to Professor Rance or Solsen 'today'.  However, we would be starting to use Steam boxes, hydrotherapy, lobotomies, and radium therapy instead.

The steam box. Basically using water and sweat to calm people. The science showed them it might work and for some it did, especially in inebriates asylums.  But...In our era, 188X, focus had shifted from incarceration and chains to treatments.  Some of these treatments were misguided or fundamentally flawed.

Treatments would continue to improve after Freud as people tried different techniques in their quest to help.  However conditions were still far from perfect and corrupt practices still had rational, innocent people taken away to private asylums. Journalists would soon begin exposing this world in more depth.  Unsurprisingly there were very few who would check themselves in during the era of the Tranquillizer chair.  Now exposes would become more frequent as more journalists began to feel safer committing themselves to get their stories, and the rampant abuse, terrible conditions, and corruption would be exposed.

The Victorian era, our era, actually set the stage for modern mental hospitals with the advances we made. Reforms would continue and eventually bedlams would abandon some of their morals due to overcrowding and more unstable patients.  Asylums would eventually fall out of favor and be replaced with mental hospitals

To cover everything that covers asylums would take far more than an hour could possibly contain, so here are a few resources you can use:

http://studymore.org.uk/mhhtim.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_treatment
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2141741/Sent-asylum-The-Victorian-women-locked-suffering-stress-post-natal-depression-anxiety.html

But really it takes only a few seconds of research these days to find the abuse.  It's much harder to find the humanity hidden in there.

I will finish off by saying this. There is help, and you should not let anything I say or reveal during this salon stop anyone from seeking assistance should they need it.  Even if some psychiatrists got their license from a cracker jackbox, and others mock those who need help or medication, do not let that stop you from seeking needed assistance. Unless someone is a mental health specialist themselves, they have no right to comment upon your mental health in any way.

Fin~




Æther Salon - Asylums! (Unedited Transcript)

[14:08] Luncheon Plate Mk 2: Have some petit fours.
[14:08] Solace Fairlady: The baron is cost cutting again, i am sure they were petit fives last time
[14:09] Darlingmonster Ember whispers: :D
[14:09] Tepic Harlequin: Grand Eights is better.....
[14:09] Stereo Nacht: Good day Ms. Andrea!
[14:09] Beryl Strifeclaw: Well, I'll give it another few minutes due to the unusual things going on with getting word out
[14:09] Russell A. FirecrestRussell A. Firecrest admires the wide array of interesting looking people.
[14:10] Darlingmonster Ember: welcome Miss Andrea
[14:10] Solace Fairlady: welcome back m Davis
[14:10] Stereo Nacht: I think I did my best... If people want to relay to more groups, feel free!
[14:10] Solace Fairlady: Hello Andrea!
[14:10] Stereo Nacht: Good day Mr. lighthouse!
[14:11] Andrea Jones: Greetings all
[14:11] Stereo Nacht: Good day Ms. Sera!
[14:11] Now playing: Igor Kipnis - Scarlatti (D): Harpsichord Sonata In D, K 443 [7xt]
[14:11] Stereo Nacht: Good day Ms. Writer!
[14:11] Sera: Hello Miz Nacht
[14:11] Darlingmonster EmberDarlingmonster Ember gets out her notebook and quill
[14:12] Ceejay Writer: Good Day, Stereo, and all!
[14:12] Beryl Strifeclaw: Hello everyone.
[14:12] Solace Fairlady: Hello Miss Ceejay, miss Srea!
[14:12] Solace Fairlady: *Srea
[14:12] Emerson LighthouseEmerson Lighthouse waves to Stereo
[14:12] Solace Fairlady: *S e r a
[14:12] Solace Fairlady: and m lighthouse
[14:12] Stereo Nacht: You'll get it, Ms. Solace! ;-)
[14:12] Ceejay Writer: I'll stay as long as I can, but at some point RL is going to haul me off by the collar.
[14:12] Sera: Hello everyone and thanks Miz Fairlady
[14:13] Solace Fairlady: one day, Stereo:)
[14:13] Emerson LighthouseEmerson Lighthouse nods and smiles to Ms Fairlady
[14:15] Beryl Strifeclaw: Most of you know me as Beryl Strifeclaw.  I keep the asylum here in New Babbage afloat when I'm not off on some insane quest or other unexpected madness.
[14:15] Beryl Strifeclaw: Let me begin this by saying how this journey began for me and the reason that I began taking an interest in asylums and mental hospitals, long before I joined SL.
[14:16] Beryl Strifeclaw: It had nothing to do with a fascination with the past.  I met someone who actually worked in a hospital treating those in need.  I would soon learn something from them that you aren't going to see in a history book or a newspaper.
[14:16] Darlingmonster Ember: ooo
[14:16] Beryl Strifeclaw: Everyone probably has or had a friend, or at least seen depicted on TV, where someone cannot stand how their profession is depicted on screen.  Real lawyers who hate how slimey they are represented, Doctors who despise being compared to their television actors (Patch Adams), Cheerleaders as the brainless bullies, and soldiers complain the truth is never accurately depicted.
[14:17] Beryl Strifeclaw: My friend had similar complaints about mental institutions, except theirs was that in all forms of media the asylum or hospital was never there to actually help anyone.  It was always a backdrop for some twisted location where no one listened, people experimented uncarringly upon patients, or delighted in torturing their victims.
[14:17] Beryl Strifeclaw: To them every asylum or mental hospital represented in stories was always the backdrop of a 'torture porn' where those who worked there had no redeeming qualities at all.  The most recent examples of these I've spoken to them about was American Horror Story: Asylum and the psyciatrist in American Horror Story: Murder House.
[14:18] Beryl Strifeclaw: She despised both of these depictions as it only further serves the negative perception in the public mind toward mental health facilities.  The worst part for her was when the psyciatrist in Murder House called therapy a sick joke and no one was ever helped by it. She found that offensive to everything she represented.
[14:18] Darlingmonster Ember: nods
[14:18] Beryl Strifeclaw: Often when people speak of mental hospitals and asylums this picture of torment and torture is brought to mind first.  Sadly it is just another thing, like the social stigma and mockery surrounding medication or needing therapy, that adds to the anxiety that make many people forgo the help that they could get.
[14:19] Beryl Strifeclaw: There is no getting around that terrible things happened in these places, and the manner of their corruptions might still surprise you. However, if you take nothing else out of this, I hope it will be to realize that there are still people working in these facilities, which have much better practices today than even twenty years ago.  For every uncaring individual wanting their paycheck, or corrupt practicioners, there are people who want to help those in need and nothing I say today should stop you from seeking them out.
[14:19] Beryl Strifeclaw: With that said lets go back to the earliest asylums...
[14:19] Darlingmonster EmberDarlingmonster Ember applauds
[14:20] Beryl Strifeclaw: In 872, Ahmad ibn Tulun built a hospital in Cairo that provided care to the insane, which included music therapy.  Bimaristans were Islamic institutions that were later described by European travelers who wrote about their wonder at the care and kindness shown to 'lunatics'. Despite this medical historians would say, "They were a drop in the ocean for the vast population that they had to serve, and their true function lay in highlighting ideals of compassion and bringing together the activities of the medical profession."  (Roy Porter 1997 The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity)
[14:20] Rowan Entilles: +
[14:21] Beryl Strifeclaw: In Europe during the medieval era, the 'mad' were housed in a variety of settings. Monsasteries, towers (fools' towers), hospitals and more.  The ancient Parisian hospital Hôtel-Dieu also had a small number of cells set aside for lunatics, whilst the town of Elbing boasted a madhouse, the Tollhaus, attached to the Teutonic Knights' hospital. Dave Sheppard's Development of Mental Health Law and Practice began in 1285 with a case that linked "the instigation of the devil" with being "frantic and mad".
[14:22] Beryl Strifeclaw: The level of provision for the care and control of the insane remained extremely limited at the turn of the 18th century. Madness was seen as a domestic problem, with families and parish authorities central to regimens of care. Parish authorities would often provide financial support, the provision of parish nurses and, where family care was not possible, lunatics might be 'boarded out' to other members of the local community or committed to private madhouses or workhouses.
[14:22] Beryl Strifeclaw: In the late 17th century, this model began to change, and privately run asylums for the insane began to proliferate and expand in size. Already in 1632 it was recorded that Bethlem Royal Hospital, London had "below stairs a parlor, a kitchen, two larders, a long entry throughout the house, and 21 rooms wherein the poor distracted people lie, and above the stairs eight rooms more for servants and the poor to lie in".  (Allderidge, Patricia 1979 Management and Mismanagement at Bedlam)
[14:23] Beryl Strifeclaw: Inmates who were deemed dangerous or disturbing were chained, but Bethlem was an otherwise free roaming building. Its inhabitants could wander around its confines and possibly throughout the general neighborhood in which the hospital was situated.  In 1676, Bethlem expanded into newly built premises at Moorfields with a capacity for 100 inmates.
[14:24] Beryl Strifeclaw: Practices such as leeching the patients and restraints such as the 'Tranquilizer chair' were used during this era.
[14:24] Beryl Strifeclaw: This, is the tranquilizer chair
[14:25] Stereo Nacht: Ah! Sensory deprivation...
[14:25] Tepic Harlequin: blimey! that'd do it
[14:25] Stereo Nacht: (more or less)
[14:25] Beryl Strifeclaw: Completely
[14:25] Philip Sexton: Convenient
[14:25] Beryl Strifeclaw: The idea was that they couldn't see, hear or otherwise get any stimulation
[14:25] Russell A. Firecrest: I don't think I'd find that particularly calming.
[14:25] Beryl Strifeclaw: The bucket was for what you think it was or
[14:25] Beryl Strifeclaw: The mad were more likely to go more insane in these conditions
[14:25] Tepic Harlequin: convienient, anyhows.....
[14:26] Stereo Nacht: yeah... I expect...
[14:26] Beryl Strifeclaw: But that was because they weren't intrested in treating the patients
[14:26] Beryl Strifeclaw: Privately run asylums quickly got a reputation for caring more about profits than care for their patients.  The August 19, 1858 edition of The Times printed an editorial about three cases of wrongful confinement. The editor used those accounts, which were filled with detailed descriptions of greed and corruption leading to these confinements revealed the subpar regulations in place. People were bribing doctors to wrongfully commit relatives in order to recieve their inheritances early among other things.
[14:27] Philip Sexton: Hah!
[14:27] Beryl Strifeclaw: According to the editor any man or woman could, without much difficulty, be incarcerated in a Private Lunatic Asylum when fully within the realm of reason.  Private asylums like these would have been employed by the upper class, as they were expensive, but in the case of inhertiance it was sometimes worth the cost.
[14:28] Beryl Strifeclaw: The corruption went further.  Sometimes Asylum directors were bribed to ensure better care was given to one specific patient. Someone who wanted to lock up their sister or mother but ensure nothing bad happened to them.  The fear of abuse made the Doctors even more influential because even judges and politicians had to use their services for members of their family.
[14:28] Beryl Strifeclaw: By failing to place a relative who was thought to be insane or problematic to the status quo into an asylum, families were opening up the possibilities of “immediate danger, disgraceful scenes, and exposures” to the public and ruining their family image. (Monroe, Henry Articles on Reform in Private Asylums. Deviance, Disorder, and the Self.)
[14:28] Beryl Strifeclaw: In this era where your image was everything, incarcerating anyone who shamed your family on the surface was important to your own welfare.
[14:29] Beryl Strifeclaw: There were asylums for 'hysterical women' and 'drunkards' and women who were guilty of 'infidelity'.  Here are just a few things that could get one involuntarily committed: 
Insanity caused by anxiety, Epilepsy,  Insanity caused by childbirth, Insanity caused by overwork, depression, inebriation, and infidelty (known as 'Moral Insanity')
[14:30] Beryl Strifeclaw: Even their opinions were enough to get women incarcerated.  The men who were in charge of these women, either a husband, father, or brother, could send women to mental institutions stating that they believed that these women were mentally ill because of their strong opinions.  Between the years of 1850-1900, women were placed in mental institutions for behaving in ways the male society did not agree with.
[14:30] Tepic Harlequin: ladies with strong opinions? scandelous!
[14:30] Beryl Strifeclaw: "These men had the last say when it came to the mental health of these women, so if they believed that these women were mentally ill, or if they simply wanted to silence the voices and opinions of these women, they could easily send them to mental institutions. This was an easy way to render them vulnerable and submissive."  (Packard, E.P. (1873). Modern persecution, or, Insane asylums unveiled as demonstrated by the report of the Investigating Committee of the Legislature of Illinois.)
[14:31] Beryl Strifeclaw: However, not everyone was corrupt.  And even the corrupt ones did not stand in the way as things were changing for the better as the world was getting ready for Sigmund Frued's theories.  Even decades before his studies into psycotherapy things were becoming more humane during the Enlightenment and 'Optimistic' asylum periods.
[14:31] Stereo Nacht: (I would have been sent to one!)
[14:31] Beryl Strifeclaw: I will take a moment while you digest the idea of an optimistic asylum period.
[14:32] Beryl Strifeclaw: Ready now?  Yay.  Attitudes towards the mentally ill began to change. It came to be viewed as a disorder that required compassionate treatment that would aid in the rehabilitation of the victim. When the ruling monarch of the United Kingdom George III, who suffered from a mental disorder, experienced a remission in 1789, mental illness came to be seen as something which could be treated and cured.
[14:33] Beryl Strifeclaw: Therapeutic Optimism in asylums ran from about 1830 to around 1860 and were at its height in the 1840s. Asylums built under the 1808 and 1828 County Asylums Act tended to be left to the management of doctors. As the theories and techniques of managing lunatics in asylums developed, so did the belief that this asylum treatment itself was the correct, scientific way to cure 'lunacy'.
[14:33] Tepic Harlequin: funny that, the bloke in charge gets ill, an suddely yer can cure it...
[14:33] Beryl Strifeclaw: Signs of the therapeutic change can be seen in the changing legislation. The 1828 Madhouses Act, unlike the 1774 Act, was concerned about conditions in asylums. These included the 'moral conditions'. Official visitors were required to inquire about the performance of divine service and its effects. In 1832, this inquiry was extended to include "what description of employment, amusement or recreation (if any) is provided".
[14:34] Beryl Strifeclaw: This was not much, but it was a start.
[14:34] Beryl Strifeclaw: In May 1839 John Connolly visited Lincoln Asylum where Robert Gardiner Hill had abolished mechanical restraint of patients in a small asylum. On appointment to Hanwell, Connolly proceeded to abolish it in a large asylum. Several English asylums were practising non-restraint by 1844.
[14:34] Stereo Nacht: (Hence the saying: "If men could get pregnant, abortions would be free and easy to get!" :-P )
[14:34] Beryl Strifeclaw: Doctors were already recognizing that chains and restraints were worsening the patients conditions instead of helping them recover.  To paraphrase the friend I mentioned at the beginning, 'because real life isn't a horror story where doctors are soulless monsters, they did what scientists are supposed to do and changed their practices to fit the science.'
[14:35] Beryl Strifeclaw: Iron chains, mercury pills, and Tranquilizer chairs were being abandoned for more humane treatments and eventually most were discontinued completely in the 1850's as a failed experiment along with bleeding the patients.
[14:35] Philip Sexton: Mercury pills?
[14:36] Beryl Strifeclaw: Outdated treatments, there were many
[14:36] Beryl Strifeclaw: Instead they began to utilize actions and the freedom to move around their tiny rooms.  When left with nothing to do but live in the tiny space patients often went mad even when they were sane before but activites were being introduced.  Painting, reading, and game activities.
[14:36] Tepic Harlequin: well, if yer sane an yer take mercury, yer go insane... so.... if yer insane...
[14:36] Philip SextonPhilip Sexton nods
[14:36] Beryl Strifeclaw: So while you might have found devices like the tranquilizer chair in the old asylum in Babbage, the Dunsany, it was considered archaic to Professor Rance or Solsen 'today'.  However, we would be starting to use Steam boxes, hydrotherapy, lobotomies, and radium therapy instead.
[14:37] Beryl Strifeclaw: The steam box
[14:38] Rowan Entilles: excellent they can lose weight too, i suppose
[14:38] Beryl Strifeclaw: Basically using water and sweat to calm people
[14:38] Russell A. FirecrestRussell A. Firecrest chuckles
[14:38] Rowan Entilles: they should have required doctors to use their contrivances
[14:38] Wright Davis: they're not far off, a sauna can be very calming
[14:39] Beryl Strifeclaw: Yes, the science showed them it might work and for some it did
[14:39] Darlingmonster Ember: radium makes everything better
[14:39] Beryl Strifeclaw: Especially in inebriates asylums
[14:39] Beryl Strifeclaw: Buut
[14:39] Beryl Strifeclaw: In our era, 188X, focus had shifted from incarceration and chains to treatments.  Some of these treatments were misguided or fundamentally flawed.
[14:39] Wright Davis: obviously there is a but
[14:39] Beryl Strifeclaw: Treatments would continue to improve after Frued as people tried different techniques in their quest to help.  However conditions were still far from perfect and corrupt practices still had rational, innocent people taken away to private asylums.
[14:39] Beryl Strifeclaw: Journalists would soon begin exposing this world in more depth.  Unsurpiringly there were very few who would check themselves in during the era of the Tranquilizer chair.  Now exposes would become more frequent as more journalists began to feel safer committing themselves to get their stories, and the rampant abuse, terrible conditions, and corruption would be exposed.
[14:40] Beryl Strifeclaw: The Victorian era, our era, actually set the stage for modern mental hospitals with the advances we made.
[14:40] Stereo Nacht: (I'll pass on the steam chair - sometimes, even local temps are too hot for my little penguin self!)
[14:40] Beryl Strifeclaw: Reforms would continue and eventually bedlams would abandon some of their morals due to overcrowding and more unstable patients.  Asylums would eventually fall out of favor and be replaced with mental hospitals
[14:41] Andrea Jones: Well we had a queen in charge.
[14:41] Philip Sexton chuckles
[14:41] Beryl Strifeclaw: To cover everything that covers asylums would take far more than an hour could possibly contain, so here are a few resources you can use:
[14:41] Beryl Strifeclaw: http://studymore.org.uk/mhhtim.htm
[14:42] Beryl Strifeclaw: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_treatment
[14:42] Beryl Strifeclaw: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2141741/Sent-asylum-The-Victorian-women-locked-suffering-stress-post-natal-depression-anxiety.html
[14:42] Beryl Strifeclaw: But really it takes only a few seconds of research these days to find the abuse.  It's much harder to find the humaity hidden in there.
[14:43] Beryl Strifeclaw: I will finish off by saying this.
[14:43] Beryl Strifeclaw: There is help, and you should not let anything I say or reveal during this salon stop anyone from seeking assistance should they need it.  Even if some psyciatrists got their license from a cracker jackbox, and others mock those who need help or medication, do not let that stop you from seeking needed assistance.
[14:43] Beryl Strifeclaw: Unless someone is a mental health specialist themselves, they have no right to comment upon your mental health in any way.
[14:43] Beryl Strifeclaw: Fin~
[14:43] Sera: agreed
[14:43] Darlingmonster EmberDarlingmonster Ember applauds
[14:43] Stereo Nacht:  `*.¸.*´ APPLAUSE `*.¸.*´APPLAUSE `*.¸.*´
[14:43] SeraSera applauds
[14:44] Rowan Entilles: ^-^
[14:44] Solace FairladySolace Fairlady applauds
[14:44] Darlingmonster EmberDarlingmonster Ember applauds
[14:44] Rowan Entilles: wonderful!
[14:44] Philip SextonPhilip Sexton applauds
[14:44] Salon Speaker Tipjar: Thank you for supporting the Aether Salon, Darlingmonster Ember!
[14:44] Solace Fairlady: Thank you beryl!
[14:44] Salon Speaker Tipjar: Thank you for supporting the Aether Salon, Wildstar Beaumont!
[14:44] Russell A. FirecrestRussell A. Firecrest claps
[14:44] Juliette Moldylocks: Thank you, Beryl. Well done!
[14:44] Rowan Entilles: thank you so much
[14:44] Stereo Nacht: Thank you Ms. Beryl!
[14:44] Darlingmonster Ember: very nice
[14:45] Philip Sexton: Madam, you kept an orderly house *smiles*
[14:45] Beryl Strifeclaw: It's okay
[14:45] Darlingmonster Ember: Grins
[14:45] Solace Fairlady: a very informative and thoughtful presentation Beryl
[14:45] Beryl Strifeclaw: I'll take questions if you have any of course
[14:46] OldeSoul Eldemar: Raises hand
[14:46] Beryl Strifeclaw: Yes Olde?
[14:46] OldeSoul Eldemar: Beryl is there a copy of your presentation so I may read it
[14:46] Beryl Strifeclaw: Actually yes
[14:47] OldeSoul Eldemar: Thank you so much !
[14:47] Darlingmonster Ember: a question: it seems the medical profession actually redirects expertise every 10 years, is that speeding up like most science? Are they learning things faster about care for duress?
[14:47] OldeSoul Eldemar: that is fine, whenever
[14:48] Jedburgh Dagger: Medicine is really very conservative to change in many ways
[14:48] Beryl Strifeclaw: With the internet things really sped up with the sharing of information and practices
[14:48] Beryl Strifeclaw: But yes, things are still slow.
[14:48] Darlingmonster Ember: ah
[14:48] Darlingmonster Ember: thank you
[14:48] Beryl Strifeclaw: They still need to be licensed unlike the first asylums I mentioned
[14:48] Stereo Nacht: I guess the "at least, do no harm" finally means something... (Most of the time)
[14:48] Jedburgh Dagger: The bulldog clamp was developed for surgery in the early 1900s and was still being used in some places up until the late 80s
[14:49] Beryl Strifeclaw: Most of those and the private ones had no licenses and it wasn't required till the 1800's
[14:49] SeraSera shakes head in amazement
[14:50] Beryl Strifeclaw: The private asylums were the worst offenders usually
[14:50] Solace Fairlady: thank you Beryl, and to the salon:)
[14:50] Solace FairladySolace Fairlady bobs a curtsey
[14:50] Darlingmonster EmberDarlingmonster Ember curtsies
[14:50] Philip Sexton: Most interesting talk.
[14:50] Stereo Nacht: Good night Ms. Solace, Ms. Ember!
[14:50] OldeSoul Eldemar: Take care ladies
[14:51] Sera: Thank you Beryl. Well done
[14:51] Juliette Moldylocks: Good evening, all.  Thank you again, Beryl.

Friday, May 27, 2016

Æther Salon - Secret Societies! (Unedited Transcript)

[2016/05/22 13:57:24] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Ah, there is our perpetrator.
[2016/05/22 13:57:25] Jimmy Branagh: Hoy!
[2016/05/22 13:57:30] Myrtil Igaly: 'ello!
[2016/05/22 13:57:58] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Fraulein Myrtil! Welcome.
[2016/05/22 13:58:07] Myrtil Igaly: Thank you Baron!
[2016/05/22 13:58:11] Zaida Gearbox: i'm sorry i rezzed into a wall and had to get out
[2016/05/22 13:58:18] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Hallo, Zaida.
[2016/05/22 13:58:22] Freya: I did the same, Miss Gearbox
[2016/05/22 13:58:25] Myrtil Igaly: Hey Zaida!
[2016/05/22 13:58:27] Caesar Osterham: These things happen
[2016/05/22 13:58:33] Jimmy Branagh: Awlroight the gift is set. Just left-click the sign.
[2016/05/22 13:58:40] Zaida Gearbox squees with delight MYRTIL!!!
[2016/05/22 13:58:42] Jimmy Branagh: Read the instructions
[2016/05/22 13:58:45] Myrtil Igaly: hehe
[2016/05/22 13:58:45] Jimmy Branagh: hehe
[2016/05/22 14:00:22] Zaida Gearbox waves to mr. caesar and the professor
[2016/05/22 14:00:43] Myrtil Igaly looks around the room to see who are the other members
[2016/05/22 14:00:54] Nicholas Murdock: Do we need sound on or anything for this?
[2016/05/22 14:01:18] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Nein, but Herr Jimmy has some music that can be played via browser for this event.
[2016/05/22 14:01:19] Freya: Ah, the ambient sound in NB is a treat in itself.
[2016/05/22 14:01:26] Myrtil Igaly: you don't "need" sound but you can get in the mood by listening to that:
https://soundcloud.com/jocelyn-pook-official/jocelyn-pook-masked-ball-eyes-wide-shut
[2016/05/22 14:01:47] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Danke, Fraulein Myrtil.
[2016/05/22 14:01:57] Myrtil Igaly: Welcome!
[2016/05/22 14:02:22] Nicholas Murdock wonders if he needs his apron ;)
[2016/05/22 14:02:22] Myrtil Igaly: and also wearing the gift Jimmy provided and that you can get by clicking the big sign next to the stage
[2016/05/22 14:03:16] Myrtil Igaly: I think everyone's landing into the wall
[2016/05/22 14:03:17] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach finds his Baronin in the midnight gloom and waves to her
[2016/05/22 14:03:23] Darlingmonster Ember: side door only today
[2016/05/22 14:03:48] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Hallo, Fraulein Ember.
[2016/05/22 14:03:50] Darlingmonster Ember: the tp point seems to be lockd down
[2016/05/22 14:03:57] Myrtil Igaly: people outside, go around the building and enter through the right door
[2016/05/22 14:03:57] Darlingmonster Ember: hullo Herr Baron
[2016/05/22 14:03:57] Solace Fairlady: Hello your serenity:)
[2016/05/22 14:03:59] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Ja.
[2016/05/22 14:04:13] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: I put out signs in hope they would rez in time.
[2016/05/22 14:04:18] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach looks sardonic
[2016/05/22 14:04:14] Zantabraxus smiles at her busy husband
[2016/05/22 14:04:23] Myrtil Igaly: Hey Marianne!
[2016/05/22 14:04:23] Captain Killian: Hello all
[2016/05/22 14:04:27] Zantabraxus: Greetings, Solace, DME
[2016/05/22 14:04:36] Zaida Gearbox waves to marianne
[2016/05/22 14:04:58] Captain Killian: will this fine lecture be in voice?
[2016/05/22 14:05:14] Myrtil Igaly: in text
[2016/05/22 14:05:19] Myrtil Igaly: and 'ello Captain!
[2016/05/22 14:05:25] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Nein, in chat and with the music mentioned earlier.
[2016/05/22 14:05:29] Marianne McCann: Hiya
[2016/05/22 14:05:34] Captain Killian: ah, thank you Miss Myrtil, and nice to see you again
[2016/05/22 14:05:41] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Fraulein Marianne! What a delight.
[2016/05/22 14:06:22] Zaida Gearbox regards a doctor named hannibal with greatest suspicion
[2016/05/22 14:06:37] Wildstar Beaumont: :)
[2016/05/22 14:06:54] Dr. Hannibal Carthegan smiles at Zaida from behind the mask
[2016/05/22 14:07:02] Jimmy Branagh: Plaese observe the sign to your left. Free! Stuff! And! Instructions!
[2016/05/22 14:07:05] Jimmy Branagh: Avail!
[2016/05/22 14:07:06] Freya holds on to his shoulders protectively. "I vouch for him, Miss Gearbox."
[2016/05/22 14:07:28] Zaida Gearbox: you're sure he won't eat me miz freya?
[2016/05/22 14:07:39] Solace Fairlady: Hello your majesty Zanta! and Admiral Wildstar:0
[2016/05/22 14:08:10] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Everyone, bitte, follow the instructions on the brightly-lit sign at the stage before we get started for best effect.
[2016/05/22 14:08:19] Freya smiles, 'Well, if you're a good Zaida, I'd not worry!"
[2016/05/22 14:08:51] Zaida Gearbox: i'm the best zaida - i'm the very zaidaest zaida who ever zaida'd
[2016/05/22 14:09:05] Azura Loring giggles.
[2016/05/22 14:09:08] Nicholas Murdock: Must we wear the mask? I've been working hard to aclimate everyone to my visage so they don't flinch ;)
[2016/05/22 14:09:28] Myrtil Igaly: It's not mandatory, but you'll get recognized :op
[2016/05/22 14:09:45] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach chuckles
[2016/05/22 14:09:46] Jimmy Branagh: Yes, someone is taking notes ...
[2016/05/22 14:09:51] Freya: Then you should be fine, Zaida!
[2016/05/22 14:09:58] Nicholas Murdock: Oh, I've been in much more disreputable places than this.
[2016/05/22 14:10:11] Myrtil Igaly: You dunno yet how disreputable it's gonna be!
[2016/05/22 14:10:34] Myrtil Igaly: we're talking about Jimmy Branagh after all
[2016/05/22 14:10:38] Lady Sumoku: It has a reputation for being disreputable.
[2016/05/22 14:10:45] Nicholas Murdock: Hey, I took a date to The Story of O in college. I don't blush easily ;)
[2016/05/22 14:10:53] Jimmy Branagh calls from behind the curtain and asks "WHAT IS THE PASSWORD?"
[2016/05/22 14:11:07] Myrtil Igaly: Swordfish I think
[2016/05/22 14:11:08] Darlingmonster Ember: What could go wrong!
[2016/05/22 14:11:12] Captain Killian: umm, password?
[2016/05/22 14:11:15] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Let me thank you all for coming, and issue a few 'housekeeping' points of order.
[2016/05/22 14:11:18] Jimmy Branagh: "WHAT IS THE PASSWORD?"
[2016/05/22 14:11:21] Zaida Gearbox: open sessame!
[2016/05/22 14:11:27] Myrtil Igaly: ummm hmmmm
[2016/05/22 14:11:27] Nicholas Murdock shouts "Oh Lord, have mercy on the son of a Widow" ;)
[2016/05/22 14:11:29] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 1) To ensure you can hear the speaker, stand or sit on the patterned carpet.
[2016/05/22 14:11:32] Lady Sumoku: The password is the phrase used to allow entrance.
[2016/05/22 14:11:33] Caesar Osterham: Duck season!
[2016/05/22 14:11:37] Marianne McCann: Walt sent me!
[2016/05/22 14:11:39] Ceejay Writer: Wabbit season
[2016/05/22 14:11:42] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 2) If you do not have a wearable chair and wish one, please contact me in IM. We also have chairs set out, feel free to sit in those. The director's chairs are for Tinies.
[2016/05/22 14:11:43] Dr. Hannibal Carthegan: Password is secret
[2016/05/22 14:11:51] Freya: Wabbit Season!
[2016/05/22 14:11:53] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 3) Please remove all lag-feeding thingamajigs you might be wearing.
[2016/05/22 14:12:05] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 4) A tip jar is out for our speaker. Do please show your appreciation!
[2016/05/22 14:12:15] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 5) Any tips to help support the establishment will also be welcome - just click on one of the support signs or this handsome clank floating above us.
[2016/05/22 14:12:22] Caesar Osterham: I say it's duck season and I say FIRE!!!
[2016/05/22 14:12:24] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 6) If you are not a member of the AEther Salon group, there are signs that will let you join up. You'll be most heartily welcome.
[2016/05/22 14:12:34] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 7) Edited and unedited transcripts of these proceedings will be posted at aethersalon.blogspot.com.
[2016/05/22 14:12:44] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: 8) Tea and treats are set out - help yourself! Beware of lurking Hatchies guarding the sweet biscuits.
[2016/05/22 14:12:46] Freya: Do you want me to shoot you now, or wait 'til you get home?
[2016/05/22 14:12:55] Zaida Gearbox: shhhhhhhh
[2016/05/22 14:13:40] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Our speaker, Herr Jimmy Branagh, has been a frequent visitor to the Aether Salon stage, stunning his audiences with his dramatic presentations. He has a few special instructions for you today to enhance this event.
[2016/05/22 14:13:51] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Herr Jimmy, the stage is yours.
[2016/05/22 14:14:21] Jimmy Branagh: 1) Change lighting to MIDNIGHT, with ALM and local lights on. The more stuff the better. Drop your Draw Distance if necessary.

2) ADD, don't WEAR your gift and the spinner.

If you would like some musical background when the curtain opens, go to

https://soundcloud.com/jocelyn-pook-official/jocelyn-pook-masked-ball-eyes-wide-shut

You can minimize the screen immediately, the music should start on its own.

Keep an eye on the people sitting around you. You just never know.
[2016/05/22 14:15:02] Myrtil Igaly looks around and jumps in her chair as she spots Zaida
[2016/05/22 14:15:41] Silas Merlin: Hello everyone
[2016/05/22 14:15:49] Zaida Gearbox puts her fingers up to her ears and waves them up at myrtil
[2016/05/22 14:15:49] Myrtil Igaly: Salut Silas!
[2016/05/22 14:16:04] Darlingmonster Ember mumbles
[2016/05/22 14:16:14] Jimmy Branagh: Shall we begin?
[2016/05/22 14:16:18] Holly: so sorry
[2016/05/22 14:16:36] Myrtil Igaly nods, keeping her mask in place with a hand
[2016/05/22 14:16:50] Jimmy Branagh: Thank you for coming today. The sheer volume of information on so-called "secret societies" fairly renders them not so secret, and it would be impossible to cover it all in the short time we have today.
[2016/05/22 14:17:08] Jimmy Branagh: Hopefully, I will peak your interest in doing some research of your own, because after all, the person sitting next to you may well be a member of such a society, and is ... observing you.
[2016/05/22 14:17:14] Mari Moonbeam: where is gift and spinner ?
[2016/05/22 14:17:17] Jimmy Branagh chuckles and clears his throat.
[2016/05/22 14:17:28] Jimmy Branagh: A secret society is a club or an organization whose activities, events, and inner functioning are concealed from non-members. The society may or may not attempt to conceal its existence.
[2016/05/22 14:17:28] Myrtil Igaly: in the big sign on the left of the stage
[2016/05/22 14:17:39] Jimmy Branagh: The term usually excludes covert groups, such as intelligence agencies or guerrilla insurgencies, that hide their activities and memberships but maintain a public presence.
[2016/05/22 14:17:52] Jimmy Branagh: The exact qualifications for labeling a group a secret society are disputed, but definitions generally rely on the degree to which the organization insists on secrecy, and might involve the retention and transmission of secret knowledge, the denial of membership or knowledge of the group, the creation of personal bonds between members of the organization, and the use of secret rites or rituals which solidify members of the group.
[2016/05/22 14:18:09] Jimmy Branagh: Genuine secret societies have existed for centuries, conducting their business in darkened back rooms and more often than not, exerting a mysterious influence upon our culture. Through history there have been many secret societies and countless conspiracy theories about those societies.
[2016/05/22 14:18:29] Jimmy Branagh: I had planned to bounce around the subject and discuss many of these societies, but due to time constraints I will proceed with the most well-known as there is a lot of information. I will cover as much as possible. It will all be included in the transcript.
[2016/05/22 14:18:51] Jimmy Branagh: This is the sign of Ordo Templi Orientis.
[2016/05/22 14:19:00] Jimmy Branagh: Ordo Templi Orientis is a mystic organization that was started in the early twentieth century. The group was established along the same lines as the less secretive Freemasons, and supposedly relied on ritual and occult practices as a means for members to move from one level of prestige to another within the organization.
[2016/05/22 14:19:15] Jimmy Branagh: The general philosophy of the group was a belief in new age esoteric principles and practices as a method of realizing one's true identity.
[2016/05/22 14:19:27] Jimmy Branagh: Famed occultist and all-around eccentric Aleister Crowley composed much of the group's lore, including a manifesto called the Mysteria Mystica Maxima, and he later became the head of the order.
[2016/05/22 14:19:42] Otenth Håkon Paderborn: mmmmmmm
[2016/05/22 14:19:45] Jimmy Branagh: After his death, the influence and popularity of Ordo Templi Orientis began to wane, but it still exists today and has various chapters scattered across the world, chiefly in the United States, the U.K., and other parts of Europe.
[2016/05/22 14:20:03] Jimmy Branagh: As Aleister Crowley's popularity as a new age figure has continued to grow, more and more of the teachings of the Ordo Templi Orientis have come to light. As such, the group makes much less of an attempt to be secretive today than it did in the past.
[2016/05/22 14:20:22] Jimmy Branagh: This doesn't mean that they don't still have some bizarre practices. Chief among these is the group's fixation on - the more sensitive among you forgive me - the sexual, especially their teachings on the “adoration of the phallus” and the magic of masturbation.
[2016/05/22 14:20:36] Ganymeade Tunwarm: siigned OTO volumes of the Book of Thoth.
[2016/05/22 14:20:40] Ganymeade Tunwarm: fascinating
[2016/05/22 14:20:48] Myrtil Igaly: just like Sigmund Freud
[2016/05/22 14:20:58] Jimmy Branagh: The Bilderburgs
[2016/05/22 14:21:03] Freya: Oh my. I'm still laughing about the title of the book, though.
[2016/05/22 14:21:15] Jimmy Branagh: No famous members, but attendees have included Ben Bernanke, the royal families of Spain and the Netherlands, World Bank officials, and representatives from major corporations.
[2016/05/22 14:21:25] Jimmy Branagh: The Bilderberg Group is not a secret society per se, but it does operate under a similar veil of mystery, which has made it the subject of countless conspiracy theories and criticisms.
[2016/05/22 14:21:41] Jimmy Branagh: The group was started in 1954, and since then it has convened every year as an exclusive, invitation-only conference of various world leaders, captains of industry, and media moguls.
[2016/05/22 14:22:00] Jimmy Branagh: The group was originally started as a means of addressing a streak of anti-Americanism that was spreading through Europe following WWII, but over the years it appears to have morphed into a more broad discussion on reaching mutual understanding between cultures.
[2016/05/22 14:22:20] Jimmy Branagh: The Bilderberg Group has become controversial for one key reason: no press is allowed in the conference and no significant details concerning the topics discussed are ever officially released to the public.
[2016/05/22 14:22:29] Jimmy Branagh: That kind of secrecy, along with the intense security of the meeting sites, which often feature armed guards, police, and even fighter jets patrolling the skies overhead, has produced a number of conspiracy theories centered on the conference.
[2016/05/22 14:22:40] Jimmy Branagh: The most popular is that the group tries to steer the direction of public policy, financial markets, and media in certain prescribed directions of their choosing, perhaps even with the goal of forming a so-called “one world government.”
[2016/05/22 14:23:01] Jimmy Branagh: These claims have been brushed aside by the group, which claims global understanding and the end of nuclear proliferation as its main goals. How influential they may or may not be remains in dispute.
[2016/05/22 14:23:35] Jimmy Branagh: The Knights Templar
[2016/05/22 14:23:54] Jimmy Branagh: After Jerusalem fell to the crusaders in 1099, most of the crusaders who did not return to their homelands became dedicated to establishing independent Christian states.
[2016/05/22 14:24:07] Jimmy Branagh: There arose two problems for the remaining crusaders: how to protect the pilgrim routes to the newly won holy places - and the defense against Moslems surrounding the narrow strip of reconquered lands.
[2016/05/22 14:24:21] Jimmy Branagh: At this time there were only about five hundred knights available to maintain the kingdom of Jerusalem, therefore small groups banded together to take on these tasks. One such band was formed in 1115 by Hugh de Payens of Burgundy and Godfrey de Saint Adhemar, a Fleming, who recruited seven other knights from northern France.
[2016/05/22 14:24:38] Jimmy Branagh: This small voluntary group escorted pilgrims from Jerusalem to Jericho and on to Jordan, the traditional site of Jesus' baptism. In 1118 the group swore an oath to protect the pilgrims and observe the monastic vows of poverty, obedience and chastity.
[2016/05/22 14:24:58] Jimmy Branagh: The two founder-members had originally only one horse between them, a situation reflected in the order's seal. Under their vows they were to wear only clothes which were given to them and to own no possessions other than their weapons.
[2016/05/22 14:25:20] Jimmy Branagh: From these inglorious beginnings came their first name - the Poor Knights of Christ. Impressed by their devotion, the king gave them quarters in a wing of the royal palace which was located on the supposed site of the Temple of Solomon. This soon gave rise to a new name for the group - the Knights of the Temple, or Knights Templar.
[2016/05/22 14:25:45] Jimmy Branagh: The number of knights had grown by that time and they felt that they should be officially endorsed along monastic lines in accordance with their vows but with allowances for their military role. Around 1124 Hugue de Payens approached the Council of the Catholic Church, meeting at Troyes in France. It was this council which gave the Knights Templar the statutes which established them as an official military-religious order.
[2016/05/22 14:26:02] Jimmy Branagh glances at the guy in the mask ...
[2016/05/22 14:26:15] Jimmy Branagh: The Order's hierarchy consisted of the Grand Master, Seneschal, Deputy Master, Marshal, and the commanders or Masters of the provinces. Each province was divided into houses known as preceptories, each with its own commander, or preceptor. These divisions were used both in the field and in the administration of monastic life.
[2016/05/22 14:26:18] Ceejay Writer: military-religious. A hyphenated phrase that freaks me out
[2016/05/22 14:26:31] Jimmy Branagh grins
[2016/05/22 14:26:42] Jimmy Branagh: The seal of approval from both the Pope and Bernard of Clairvaux, abbot of the Cistercian monastery of Clairvaux, and from the beginning a strong supporter of the Templars, resulted in generous donations for the order.
[2016/05/22 14:26:54] Jimmy Branagh: Preceptories were quickly formed not only in Jerusalem, but in Antioch, Tripoli, Aragon and Portugal. In time preceptories were founded in Hungary, Germany, Sicily, and Greece. By spring of 1129 Templars had established a strong foothold in France, England and Scotland. In Scotland, around Aberdeen alone, a substantial quantity of Templar property was held including houses and churches in Turiff, Tullich, Maryculter, Aboyne, and Kingcausie. South of Aberdeen at Culter, they possessed a huge estate of no less than 8,000 acres.
[2016/05/22 14:26:55] Freya sends an eloquent, agreeing glance to Miss Writer.
[2016/05/22 14:26:58] Caesar Osterham: Why is that, Ceejay. The Pope actually had his own army well into the 18th Century
[2016/05/22 14:27:15] Ceejay Writer: Adn that freaks me out TOO
[2016/05/22 14:27:16] Tamlorn Carterhaugh Wood: There were quite a few religious orders of knights during the middle ages.
[2016/05/22 14:27:20] Jimmy Branagh: By the second half of the 12th century the Order was flourishing and had become one of the leading landowners in Syria and Palestine. Funds and recruits continued to arrive from Europe and in order to manage this great wealth the Templars became experts in banking. By as early as 1148 they were moneylenders, despite the Church ban on usury and they soon had one of the most efficient banking networks in the western world.
[2016/05/22 14:27:31] Solace Fairlady: anywhere in the UK with "Temple" inits name was a former holding of theirs
[2016/05/22 14:27:40] Freya murmurs, "No one expects the Inquisition...."
[2016/05/22 14:27:40] Jimmy Branagh: Yes. The Church ran the Western World in that period.
[2016/05/22 14:27:56] Jimmy Branagh: Pilgrims could now not only rely upon the protection of the Templars but could deposit money at their local preceptory and withdraw it as required by producing a letter of credit at any other preceptory.
[2016/05/22 14:28:11] Jimmy Branagh: With a common Rule, the Order's legal and economic status was similar in almost every country, however it was only in the great capitols - London, Rome and Paris - that financial dealings took precedence. Outside the capitols, each commander or preceptor used his allotted lands in the appropriate way - farming, spinning, brewing and baking.
[2016/05/22 14:28:13] Myrtil Igaly: see, they're bankers too now
[2016/05/22 14:28:21] Tamlorn Carterhaugh Wood: the Pope was both a secular and religious ruler, so he had military to defend his lands.
[2016/05/22 14:28:35] Jimmy Branagh: The Order's military reputation and strength was also growing swiftly. Throughout the 12th century the Templars, together with the Hospitaller knights, were the finest fighting force in the Holy Lands. In time however, partly because fewer recruits could be found who were willing to die for the faith and partly due to growing rivalry between the various military orders which had now been created, the Templars' military strength in the Holy Land began to decline.
[2016/05/22 14:28:49] engacia: my great uncle was a knight of the holy roman empire. he currently lays buried in westminster abby
[2016/05/22 14:29:00] Myrtil Igaly: Ooooh fame!
[2016/05/22 14:29:04] Jimmy Branagh: When Acre fell to the Moslems in 1291, after a siege of the castle which lasted weeks and included fire bombs, catapults and mines, the Holy Land was lost forever. Over 20,000 Templar knights and sergeants had met their deaths since the Order's inception. The Templars had lands in Cyprus and it was here that they created a new headquarters in the Middle East.
[2016/05/22 14:29:05] engacia: yup
[2016/05/22 14:29:24] Jimmy Branagh: Other than a few unsuccessful raids on the Syrian and Egyptian coasts, the Order deteriorated into one of bankers and moneylenders. A series of verbal attacks was launched against all military orders, the Templars in particular, suggesting they no longer had a purpose for existence since they failed to take steps to regain the Holy Land.
[2016/05/22 14:29:41] Jimmy Branagh: Nothing came of these attacks until a renegade Templar, Esquiu de Floyrian, made specific charges of blasphemy, idolatry and sodomy against the Order to Phillip the Fair (Phillip IV) of France.
[2016/05/22 14:30:02] Jimmy Branagh: The Pope was informed of the charges in 1305, and at the end of the following year the Grand Master, Jacques de Molay, was summoned to Rome. Apparently unaware of the charges against the Order, de Molay rejected the Pope's proposal that the Templars and Hospitallers unite to form one order and that a new crusade be launched. After de Molay returned to Cyprus in 1307 Phillip once again pressed the charges. The Pope agreed to an inquiry.
[2016/05/22 14:30:25] Jimmy Branagh: On September 15 of that year Phillip sent sealed instructions for the seizure of all members of the Order and their property throughout France. The brothers were thrown into prison where all except three eventually confessed – under torture – to the charges. Powerless in the light of the confessions, the Pope issued a command to all Christian princes to arrest Templars in their lands.
[2016/05/22 14:30:56] Jimmy Branagh: Soon, under torture, Templars were confessing to homosexuality, devil worship, blasphemy and corruption. In England, Spain, Cyprus and Germany they were found innocent of the charges; but in France the persecution continued and many Templars who retracted their confessions when the torture ended were burned at the stake as heretics. Finally, in 1312 the Order was suppressed; its vast wealth passed on to the Knights Hospitaller.
[2016/05/22 14:31:34] Myrtil Igaly: poor Templars
[2016/05/22 14:31:47] Nicholas Murdock: The Templars were never poor ;)
[2016/05/22 14:32:05] Jimmy Branagh: That's what happens. A familiar pattern.
[2016/05/22 14:32:18] Jimmy Branagh: The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn
[2016/05/22 14:32:22] Caesar Osterham: And both Philip the Fair and the Pope died within the year
[2016/05/22 14:32:29] Myrtil Igaly: hah!
[2016/05/22 14:32:48] Jimmy Branagh: The order of the Golden Dawn was created by Dr. William Robert Woodman, William Wynn Westcott, and Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers. All three were Freemasons and members of Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia, an organization with ties to Masonry.
[2016/05/22 14:32:52] Caesar Osterham: And they never got their hands on the order's money
[2016/05/22 14:33:14] Jimmy Branagh: It is considered by many to be a forerunner of the Ordo Templi Orientis and a majority of modern Occult groups. The belief system of the Golden Dawn is largely taken from Christian mysticism, Qabalah, Hermeticism, the religion of Ancient Egypt, Freemasonry, Alchemy, Theosophy, Magic, and Renaissance writings.
[2016/05/22 14:33:41] Jimmy Branagh: William Yeats and Aleister Crowley (He's like everywhere J.B.)are two of the more famous members of the group.
[2016/05/22 14:33:43] Myrtil Igaly: it's got a pretty symbol at least
[2016/05/22 14:33:43] Ceejay Writer: very eclectic
[2016/05/22 14:34:03] Jimmy Branagh: The fundamental documents of the order are known as the Cipher Documents. These were translated into English using a cipher attributed to Johannes Trithemius. The documents are a series of sixty folios containing magic rituals. The basic structure of many of these rituals appear to originate with Rosicrucianism. There is a great deal of controversy surrounding the origins of these documents.
[2016/05/22 14:34:43] Jimmy Branagh: The Black Hand
[2016/05/22 14:35:00] Jimmy Branagh: The Black Hand was a secret society of anti-imperialist political revolutionaries that was started in Serbia in 1912. It formed as an offshoot from Narodna Adbrona, a group that sought to unite all of the Slavic people of Europe under one country.
[2016/05/22 14:35:13] Jimmy Branagh: This required the separation of Serbia from the monarchy of Austria-Hungary, which had annexed the country some years before. With this in mind, the group began disseminating anti-Austrian propaganda and training saboteurs and assassins to disrupt political rule within the province.
[2016/05/22 14:35:28] Jimmy Branagh: Their plan was to incite a war between Serbia and Austria, which would give them a chance to free their country and unite the different Slavic nations as one.
[2016/05/22 14:35:52] Jimmy Branagh: The Black Hand would be all but forgotten today if not for their unlikely involvement in one of the biggest events of the twentieth century. In 1914, the group engineered the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand.
[2016/05/22 14:36:09] engacia: !
[2016/05/22 14:36:16] Myrtil Igaly: they got their war
[2016/05/22 14:36:17] Jimmy Branagh: The job was badly botched, and was only completed when a low-level hood named Gavrilo Princip stumbled upon the Archduke's car and shot him to death at close range. Still, the results of the assassination were catastrophic.
[2016/05/22 14:36:29] Jimmy Branagh: Within days, Austria-Hungary had declared war on Serbia, and after the allies of both countries joined the fray, the small dispute managed to escalate into WWI.
[2016/05/22 14:36:44] Jimmy Branagh: The aftermath of WWI eventually led to WWII, and this led to the Cold War, which seemingly makes The Black Hand one of the most strangely influential forces of the twentieth century.
[2016/05/22 14:37:11] Myrtil Igaly: if they had known...
[2016/05/22 14:37:25] Jimmy Branagh: Hashshashin
[2016/05/22 14:37:29] Dr. Hannibal Carthegan: And the Cold War led to the War on Terror
[2016/05/22 14:37:54] Jimmy Branagh: The Hashshashin, or Nizari, were a mysterious band of Muslim assassins that operated in the Middle East during the 13th century. The group was made up of Shia Muslims who broke off from a bigger sect and banded together in order to establish a utopian Shi'ite state.
[2016/05/22 14:38:00] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Which cycles back to the Crusades.
[2016/05/22 14:38:12] Jimmy Branagh: Because their number was small, the group used guerilla tactics in their battle against their enemies, including espionage, sabotage, and, most famously, political assassination.
[2016/05/22 14:38:15] Vernden Jervil: I have always been of the opinion that WW1 happened because the powers of Europe wanted to fight, they would have found one reason or another
[2016/05/22 14:38:39] Jimmy Branagh: The Hashshashin would plant highly trained moles inside enemy strongholds, with instructions to only attack when the time was right. They were known for their extreme discretion in minimizing civilian casualties, as well as their penchant for using stealth to intimidate their targets.
[2016/05/22 14:38:56] Jimmy Branagh: As the story goes, enemy leaders would often wake in the morning to find a Hashshashin dagger lying on their pillow, along with a note saying “you are in our grip.”
[2016/05/22 14:39:13] Jimmy Branagh: Their legend soon grew, and before the Mongols finally destroyed the group, they became well known contract killers, supposedly performing jobs for the likes of King Richard the Lionheart.
[2016/05/22 14:39:15] engacia: eep
[2016/05/22 14:39:31] Lady Sumoku: "I'm in your house, eating your cookies."
[2016/05/22 14:39:41] Jimmy Branagh laughs
[2016/05/22 14:39:45] Myrtil Igaly: would you prefer a dagger on your pillow or a cut horse head?
[2016/05/22 14:39:46] Jimmy Branagh: Mmm, cookies!
[2016/05/22 14:39:48] Freya laughs, "That's exactly what I was thinking."
[2016/05/22 14:39:59] Jimmy Branagh: Around the time of their downfall, the library that contained all Nizari records was destroyed, so much of what is known about them today has taken on the status of myth.
[2016/05/22 14:40:12] Darlingmonster Ember: darn
[2016/05/22 14:40:23] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: I highly disapprove of this rampant destruction of libraries.
[2016/05/22 14:40:31] Jimmy Branagh: The most controversial legend centers of the group's use of drugs and other intoxicants– “Hashshashin” translates roughly as “Hashish user”, which some have said were employed by the members in battle.
[2016/05/22 14:40:45] Freya is still mad about the Library of Alexandria
[2016/05/22 14:40:55] Jimmy Branagh: This has been widely discredited, but the term “Hashshashin” as it refers to the Nizari is believed to be the origin of the modern word “assassin” although that remains in dispute.
[2016/05/22 14:41:05] Jimmy Branagh: Say, that's quite a grudge!
[2016/05/22 14:41:07] Nicholas Murdock: I've found few users under the influence of marijuana capable of stealthy assassinations ;)
[2016/05/22 14:41:10] Darlingmonster Ember: ...and the now lost killer brownie recipe
[2016/05/22 14:41:19] Holly: lol
[2016/05/22 14:41:19] Myrtil Igaly: hehe
[2016/05/22 14:41:29] Freya struggles not to snort her sip of tea up her nose
[2016/05/22 14:41:51] Ceejay Writer stifles a million comments
[2016/05/22 14:41:51] engacia: struggles not to snort period.
[2016/05/22 14:42:02] Jimmy Branagh: Now the Freemasons, one of the most successful of these types of societies.
[2016/05/22 14:42:07] Myrtil Igaly: Yay!! Freemasons!
[2016/05/22 14:42:20] Lady Sumoku: No Homers!
[2016/05/22 14:42:20] Jimmy Branagh: They're everywhere
[2016/05/22 14:42:37] Freya: Hey. Fezzes are cool now.
[2016/05/22 14:42:40] Nicholas Murdock: No we're not.
[2016/05/22 14:42:42] Jimmy Branagh: If you look at the top of the Wax Museum, thay'sve even been there!
[2016/05/22 14:43:00] Myrtil Igaly: there even was a masonic lodge in Babbage Square once
[2016/05/22 14:43:05] Jimmy Branagh: The Craft that evolved into modern Freemasonry emerged in the period between the Black Death, 1348, and the Wars of the Roses, 1453. Before that date there are no trends or events that can be identified as leading definitely towards Freemasonry. It appears to have emerged from the building industry as a whole. Equally, there is no part of England that can claim the honour of originating Freemasonry.
[2016/05/22 14:43:06] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Fezzes are used in my navy's uniforms as well.
[2016/05/22 14:43:17] Freya: Case in point
[2016/05/22 14:43:22] Jimmy Branagh: The later pre-eminence of London was not apparent at that era. The Regius Poem and Cooke manuscripts, about 1390 and 1410 respectively, are written in the dialects of west and southwest of England. They may have been written for the school of masonry associated with Salisbury Cathedral.
[2016/05/22 14:43:36] Jimmy Branagh: The first recorded use of the word lodge in a Masonic context was in 1278 during the building of a Cistercian Monastery at Vale Royal near Chester. Initially the lodge was no more than a rude hut in which the masons worked and possibly took their midday meal. At other sites they may also have slept in the lodge.
[2016/05/22 14:43:55] Jimmy Branagh: By 1352 there were elaborate rules governing the behaviour of the mason connected with the lodge at York Minster. These regulations are described as the “ancient customs of the masons” (consuetudines antiquae quibus cementarii). The Master and Deputy Master were required to swear an oath that the ancient customs would be adhered to.
[2016/05/22 14:44:14] Jimmy Branagh: Fifty years later all masons were required to swear the same oath. We are not aware of anything esoteric about these customs; they mainly concerned rates of pay, hours of work, holidays etc. However, given the medieval obsession with mysticism it is unlikely that their customs were wholly mundane.
[2016/05/22 14:44:14] Marianne McCann: The hut wasn't rude, just misunderstood
[2016/05/22 14:44:29] Ceejay Writer: :D
[2016/05/22 14:44:33] Myrtil Igaly: hehe
[2016/05/22 14:44:40] Jimmy Branagh: A pen drawing by Matthew Paris, circa 1250, purports to show Henry II in conference with his masons. The men building a wall are shown using a level. The mason actually being addressed by the King is holding a large square and compass almost as if to demonstrate his importance, the implication being that he is the Master Mason.
[2016/05/22 14:44:54] Jimmy Branagh: There is a similar carving in Worcester Cathedral, circa 1224, which shows the architect clutching a pair of dividers and, apparently, discussing the plans with a monk. These may suggest the beginnings of the ceremonial significance which is now given to the square and compass.
[2016/05/22 14:45:03] Tamlorn Carterhaugh Wood: the Masons evolved from a trade Guild
[2016/05/22 14:45:08] Jimmy Branagh: The earliest occurrence of the word Freemason was in London in 1376. Four men were chosen to represent the city’s builders on the Common Council of Trades, this was the first time they had been represented. They were originally listed as Freemasons although the word is then crossed out and replaced with Mason. The possible reason for this error is significant.
[2016/05/22 14:45:33] Jimmy Branagh: Much of the building in the South of England was done with a material called Freestone. This is a form of limestone which is soft and easily worked when freshly quarried but afterwards hardens and becomes very durable. And the men who worked it were of course, called Freestone Masons. There seems to be no evidence to link the prefix free- with freedom. The balance of probability seems to suggest that Freemason is indeed a contraction of Freestone Mason.
[2016/05/22 14:45:54] Jimmy Branagh: John Wycliffe, writing about 1383, used the terms “men of sutel craft, as fre masons and others” he also refers to “fraternytes or gildis”. Then Henry Yevele, a master builder who died in 1400 may have been described as a Freemason on his tombstone. On the other hand the word Freemason appears in neither the Regius or the Cooke Manuscripts.
[2016/05/22 14:46:12] Jimmy Branagh: At this distance in time there can be no certainty but the evidence does strongly support the suggestion the Freemasonry could have developed from Guilds and Lodges of the medieval masons.
[2016/05/22 14:46:26] Jimmy Branagh: This does not mean that other movements or bodies of ideas or organizations did not also contribute significantly to survival and growth the Freemasonry.
[2016/05/22 14:46:42] Jimmy Branagh: Indeed it seems very probable an organization that has survived five hundred years must have been prepared to absorb and use any ideas that could contribute to its strength and growth.
[2016/05/22 14:47:12] Jimmy Branagh: Freemasonry has thus also been said to be a direct descendant of the “Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and the Temple of Solomon" (the Knights Templar); an offshoot of the ancient Mystery schools; an administrative arm of the Priory of Zion; the Roman Collegia; the Comacine masters; intellectual descendants of Noah;
[2016/05/22 14:47:27] Ceejay Writer: Ideas that were soft at first but hardened when built
[2016/05/22 14:47:34] Jimmy Branagh: to have existed at the time of King Athelstan of England, in the very late 10th century C.E. - Athelstan is said by some to have been converted to Christianity in York, and to have issued the first Charter to the Masonic Lodges there; and to have many other various and sundry origins.
[2016/05/22 14:47:43] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Well played, Fraulein Ceejay.
[2016/05/22 14:47:50] Darlingmonster Ember: nods
[2016/05/22 14:47:50] Ceejay Writer *curtsey*
[2016/05/22 14:48:18] Jimmy Branagh lets Ceejay enjoy her moment
[2016/05/22 14:48:22] Myrtil Igaly: hehe
[2016/05/22 14:48:31] Jimmy Branagh: It seems reasonable to suppose that, whatever its precise origins, Freemasonry provided a haven for the unorthodox and their sympathizers during a time when such activity could result in one’s death, and that this has something to do with the tradition of secret meetings and handshakes.
[2016/05/22 14:48:59] Ceejay Writer: *basks* NOW BACK TO JIMMEH
[2016/05/22 14:49:09] Jimmy Branagh: 8D
[2016/05/22 14:49:15] Nicholas Murdock: In the American South it's said Baptists who like ritual become Masons ;)
[2016/05/22 14:49:22] Jimmy Branagh: As the Middle Ages gave way to the Modern Age, the need for secrecy subsided, and Freemasons began to openly declare their association with the fraternity, which began to organize itself more formally. In 1717, four Lodges,
[2016/05/22 14:49:37] Jimmy Branagh: which met at the “Apple-Tree Tavern, the Crown Ale-House near Drury Lane, the Goose and Gridiron in St. Paul’s Churchyard, and the Rummer and Grapes Tavern in Westminster" in London, England (as recounted in (2)) combined together and formed the first public Grand Lodge, the Premier Grand Lodge of England (PGLE).
[2016/05/22 14:49:54] Jimmy Branagh: The years following saw Grand Lodges open throughout Europe, as the new Freemasonry spread rapidly. How much of this was the spreading of Freemasonry itself, and how much was the public organization of pre-existing secret lodges, is not possible to say with certainty. The PGLE in the beginning did not have the current three degrees, but only the first two. The third degree appeared, so far as we know, around 1725.
[2016/05/22 14:50:16] Jimmy Branagh: The Two Great Schisms of Freemasonry (1753 and 1877)
[2016/05/22 14:50:57] Jimmy Branagh: The PGLE (Premier Grand Lodge of England), along with those jurisdictions with which it was in amity, later came to be known colloquially as the “Moderns", to distinguish them from a newer, rival group of Freemasonry, known colloquially as the “Antients". The Antients broke away and formed their own Grand Lodge in 1753, prompted by the PGLE’s making changes to the secret modes of recognition.
[2016/05/22 14:51:07] Jimmy Branagh: The differences between the two groups ran deeper than just that, however. The “Antients" were based in York, and claimed that their version of the Freemasonic Ritual (which included an additional fourth degree, the “Royal Arch", with Christian elements) was truer to ancient tradition.
[2016/05/22 14:51:10] Nicholas Murdock: It's rumored the Grand Lodge of England was formed to put English Masonry under Hanoverian control, as opposed to the heavy Jacobite presence in Scottish Rite and Continental groups.
[2016/05/22 14:51:47] Jimmy Branagh: Interesting.
[2016/05/22 14:51:53] Jimmy Branagh: From the point of view of the Moderns (actually the older group, in spite of the name), the Antients were trying to Christianize a fraternity that had always been non-Christian and religiously non-dogmatic. From the Antient point of view, on the other hand, the fraternity had been a Christian organization during the Middle Ages, and the Moderns had de-Christianized it.
[2016/05/22 14:52:24] Jimmy Branagh: In fact, both groups changed Masonry in the eighteenth century by adding new degrees, so neither can claim to be thoroughly ancient in practice. Tensions between the two groups were very high at times. Benjamin Franklin was a “Modern" and a deist, for instance, but by the time he died, his Lodge had gone “Antient", and would no longer recognize him as one of their own, declining even to give him a Masonic funeral.
[2016/05/22 14:52:42] Jimmy Branagh: The schism was healed in the years following 1813, when the competing Grand Lodges were amalgamated, by virtue of a delicately worded compromise which left English Masonry clearly not Christian, returned the modes of recognition to their pre-1753 form,
[2016/05/22 14:52:45] Mari Moonbeam: bad form
[2016/05/22 14:52:54] Jimmy Branagh: kept Freemasonry per se as consisting of three degrees only, but which was ambiguously worded so as to allow the Moderns to think of the Antient Royal Arch degree as an optional higher degree, while still allowing the Antients to view it as the completion of the third degree.
[2016/05/22 14:53:15] Jimmy Branagh: Because both the Antients and the Moderns had “daughter" Lodges throughout the world, and because many of those Lodges still exist, there is a great deal of variability in the Ritual used today.
[2016/05/22 14:53:28] Myrtil Igaly: such diplomacy
[2016/05/22 14:53:38] Jimmy Branagh: Most Lodges conduct their Work in accordance with an agreed-upon single Rite, such as the York Rite which is popular in the United States, or the Canadian Rite which is, in some ways, a concordance between the Rites used by the “Antients" and “Moderns".
[2016/05/22 14:53:54] Jimmy Branagh: The second great schism in Freemasonry occurred in the years following 1877, when the GOdF started accepting atheists unreservedly. This on-going schism is in many ways a re-emergence of the same basic conflict that created the split between the Antients and Moderns: the religious requirements, if any, for being a Freemason.
[2016/05/22 14:54:08] Jimmy Branagh: While the issue of atheism is probably the greatest single factor in the split with the GOdF, the English also point to the French recognition of women’s Masonry and co-Masonry, as well as the tendency of French Masons to be more willing to discuss religion and politics in Lodge.
[2016/05/22 14:54:27] Jimmy Branagh: While the French curtail such discussion, they do not ban it as outright as do the English. The schism between the two branches has occasionally been breached for short periods of time, especially during the First World War when American Masons overseas wanted to be able to visit French Lodges.
[2016/05/22 14:54:44] Jimmy Branagh: Concerning religious requirements, the oldest constitution of Freemasonry that of Anderson, 1723, says only that a Mason “will never be a stupid Atheist nor an irreligious Libertine" if he “rightly understands the Art". The only religion required was “that Religion in which all Men agree, leaving their particular Opinions to themselves"
[2016/05/22 14:55:07] Jimmy Branagh: In 1815, the newly amalgamated UGLE changed Anderson’s constitutions to include more orthodox overtones: “Let a man’s religion or mode of worship be what it may, he is not excluded from the Order, provided he believes in the glorious Architect of heaven and earth, and practices the sacred duties of morality."
[2016/05/22 14:55:28] Jimmy Branagh: The English enforce this with a requirement for belief in a Supreme Being, and in his revealed will. While these requirements can still be interpreted in a non-theistic manner, they made it more difficult for unorthodox believers to enter the fraternity.
[2016/05/22 14:55:45] Jimmy Branagh: In 1849, the GOdF followed the English lead by adopting the “Supreme Being" requirement, but there was increasing pressure in Latin countries to openly admit atheists.
[2016/05/22 14:56:10] Jimmy Branagh: There was an attempt at a compromise in 1875, by allowing the alternative phrase “Creative Principle", which was less theistic-sounding than “Supreme Being", but this was ultimately not enough for the GOdF, and in 1877 they went back to having no religious entrance requirements, making the original Anderson document of 1723 their official constitution.
[2016/05/22 14:56:53] Jimmy Branagh: They also created a modified ritual that made no direct verbal reference to the G.A.O.T.U. although, as a symbol, it was arguably still present. This new Rite did not replace the older ones, but was added as an alternative. European jurisdictions in general tend not to restrict themselves to a single Rite, like most North American jurisdictions, but offer a menu of Rites, from which their Lodges can choose.
[2016/05/22 14:57:13] Jimmy Branagh: The first Freemasons lodge opened in what would become the United States on July 30, 1733. The influence of Freemasonry in the founding of the United States is still unclear, but is acknowleged to be significant
[2016/05/22 14:58:25] Oatmeal Cookie whispers: A fresh baked oatmeal cookie!
[2016/05/22 14:58:33] Jimmy Branagh: Now, the favorite of all the secret societies among conspiracy freaks ...
[2016/05/22 14:58:36] Myrtil Igaly: I wonder what the "G" stands for in the middle of their sign
[2016/05/22 14:58:52] Jimmy Branagh: The Illuminati!
[2016/05/22 14:58:53] Holly: :)
[2016/05/22 14:58:56] Jimmy Branagh: Dun dun DUUUUUN! O.o
[2016/05/22 14:58:57] Lady Sumoku: Godzilla
[2016/05/22 14:59:00] Myrtil Igaly: Yay!!
[2016/05/22 14:59:11] Jimmy Branagh: The All Seeing Eye
[2016/05/22 14:59:24] Sera Puchkina: Impressive!
[2016/05/22 14:59:27] Myrtil Igaly: shiny!
[2016/05/22 14:59:28] Jimmy Branagh: The Illuminati is one of those well-known shadowy organizations shrouded in myth and legend. They are credited with behind the scenes manipulations of world events and seen as the secret power that controls everything.
[2016/05/22 14:59:33] Solace Fairlady: Sauron!
[2016/05/22 14:59:41] Nicholas Murdock: Fnord!
[2016/05/22 14:59:48] Ceejay Writer offers visine
[2016/05/22 14:59:56] Jimmy Branagh chuckles
[2016/05/22 15:00:10] Jimmy Branagh: The Illuminati has become the modern day catch all poster child of the political evils in the world. All of which is highly ironic, as the group historically was founded on May 1, 1776, with the goals of opposing superstitions, religious influence over public life, and the abuse of power by the state.
[2016/05/22 15:00:14] Marianne McCann saw Nicholas' mouth moving, but heard no words
[2016/05/22 15:00:30] Jimmy Branagh: The Illuminati, along with other secret societies like the Freemasons, were seen as subversive in the late eighteenth century, due in large part to the influence of the Roman Catholic Church. Since then, the idea of the Illuminati has come to be associated with any secret organization that proclaims to have links with the original society, though in many cases these links are unsubstantiated.
[2016/05/22 15:00:53] Jimmy Branagh: Organized in a way very similar to that of Freemasonry, the Illuminati very likely used the Masons as a pattern for which to their model their own society. Indeed, some present day Illuminati groups claim to have origins far older than the historical 1776 account, using their connection to Freemasonry in their principal argument.
[2016/05/22 15:01:07] Jimmy Branagh: Some groups even lay claim to connections that trace back to ancient Egypt and the Ra and Isis cults that thrived in antiquity.
[2016/05/22 15:01:24] Jimmy Branagh: It is difficult to trace the history of the Illuminati much of what it did was in secret. After the original society was outlawed, what was left, allegedly, went underground to continue its work in secret. These claims include involvement in the Napoleonic Wars and were considered, by some, as responsible for the French Revolution in 1789.
[2016/05/22 15:01:43] Jimmy Branagh: Many believe that the subversive goal of the Illuminati was to form a one world government. The Congress of Vienna was, according to these beliefs, brought about by the Illuminati who hoped to achieve their goal by forming a League of Nations. When Russia refused to join, however, their plan was foiled creating, supposedly, a great deal of animosity towards the Russian powers within the Illuminati rank and file.
Congress of Vienna
[2016/05/22 15:01:58] Jimmy Branagh: The Illuminati are said to have devised a plan for there to occur three world wars over the course of the twentieth century that would lead, ultimately, to the formation of a one world government. In line with this theory, they orchestrated the tensions that led to World War 1. With the goal of destroying Imperial Russia and get revenge for the failed Congress of Vienna. World War II was likewise planned by the Illuminati to strengthen communism.
[2016/05/22 15:02:19] Nicholas Murdock: They replaced G. Washington with Adam Weishaupt ;)
[2016/05/22 15:02:26] Jimmy Branagh: There was to be a third war between political Zionists and the leaders of the Muslim world, which was to have weakened everyone to the point where a one world government was the only feasible option left. This makes for an interesting theory given the present state of geopolitical affairs at hand in the world today.
[2016/05/22 15:02:40] Ceejay Writer: Yeek.
[2016/05/22 15:02:52] Jimmy Branagh: While this is, by far, the most sensational account of the Illuminati available, very little of it can be verified historically. What we do know is that the Illuminati were founded by Adam Weishaupt, who was raised in Bavaria and educated at Jesuit school graduating ultimately from the University of Ingolstadt in 1768 with a doctorate in law. Interestingly, the Jesuits have been accused of broader conspiracies, subversive methods and conspiratorial practices.
[2016/05/22 15:03:12] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Fascinating group, the Jesuits.
[2016/05/22 15:03:18] Jimmy Branagh: Weishaupt joined the Masonic lodge in Munich in 1777, the year after he founded the Illuminati. Once he joined, he reorganized the Illuminati in order to attract more Freemasons to its ranks. While the Masons brought more influential members into Weishaupt’s society,
[2016/05/22 15:03:39] Jimmy Branagh: it also led to disagreements between his ideals and those new members. Seeing trouble and seizing an opportunity, the Bavarian government acted on disquiet at the prominence of members in governmental positions, stepped in and disbanded what was left of the Illuminati.
[2016/05/22 15:03:57] Jimmy Branagh: And still, this secret society was not unknown in the world. Letters from George Washington show that he was aware of the Illuminati’s plan to overthrow all current governments. Despite the large number of Masons among American’s founding fathers, Washington was confident that none of his allies were interested in pursuing that agenda. Washington wrote, on October 24, 1798,
[2016/05/22 15:04:14] Jimmy Branagh: "...It was not my intention to doubt that, the Doctrines of the Illuminati, and principles of Jacobinism had not spread in the United States. On the contrary, no one is more truly satisfied of this fact than I am.
[2016/05/22 15:04:15] Nicholas Murdock: Immanentize the Eschaton!
[2016/05/22 15:04:37] Jimmy Branagh: The idea that I meant to convey, was, that I did not believe that the Lodges of Free Masons in this Country had, as Societies, endeavoured to propagate the diabolical tenets of the first, or pernicious principles of the latter (if they are susceptible of seperation). That Individuals of them may have done it, or that the founder, or instrument employed to found, the Democratic Societies in the United States, may have had these objects; and actually had a seperation of the People from their Government in view, is too evident to be questioned…"
[2016/05/22 15:04:59] Jimmy Branagh: In a modern context, as a secret society, it is impossible to say if the Illuminati still exist today or not, due to their very nature. How do you disprove something that is said to not exist? There are many organizations that claim to have roots that trace back to the Illuminati though they currently exist under different names.
[2016/05/22 15:05:17] Jimmy Branagh: The formation of a one world government does not, however, seem like such a far-fetched notion with increasing globalization and the strong presence of multinational businesses and governmental styled agencies including the IMF and the United Nations.
[2016/05/22 15:05:40] Jimmy Branagh: But, how much of this is merely a perpetuation of the idea that a shadow society is calling the shots by orchestrating the maneuvering of progress. Perhaps in some respect, the ethos of the Illuminati is its legacy of its continuation in the modern world.
[2016/05/22 15:05:55] Jimmy Branagh: The use of Illuminati symbols in modern day culture helps to perpetuate the belief that the secret society is still operating in the shadows and controlling many of the world’s events.
[2016/05/22 15:06:09] Jimmy Branagh: The obvious symbolism of the All-Seeing Eye is linked pervasively with the Illuminati as seen in many places, including the currency United States. The inclusion of on the currency is an obvious chicken before the egg analogy that conspiracy theorists have latched onto as an obvious and overt sign.
[2016/05/22 15:06:32] Jimmy Branagh: The pyramid, once again present on the American $1 bill, is said to represent the hierarchy of the order. It is left unfinished to show that the goals of the society have not yet been accomplished. The Bavarian society did indeed have pyramids displayed at their meetings though once again the same symbol is often attributed to the Masons.
[2016/05/22 15:06:53] Jimmy Branagh: The owl, too, is the symbol of the goddess Minerva who was the goddess of wisdom. The Bavarian Illuminati who had reached Minerval status (in between Novice and Illuminated Minerval) especially considered it a very important symbol and included it on their medallions.
[2016/05/22 15:07:08] Jimmy Branagh: Some contemporary pretenders find a more nefarious image suggesting links to the occult. In these instances, the pentagram is also sometimes said to be a symbol used by the Illuminati in the practice of black magic.
[2016/05/22 15:07:20] Jimmy Branagh: But the Bavarian society had no occult practices that we know of in comparison to this modern day context. If a modern day Illuminati group claims the practice of magic, they most likely have no true connection to the original order.
[2016/05/22 15:07:40] Jimmy Branagh: The reality behind the Illuminati is as shadowy as its existence. Their secret nature, combined with the vast number of groups that claim lineage with them makes it impossible to trace their activities through history. Much of what is currently known about the Illuminati is little more than guesswork and greatly influenced by the sensational depiction of them in popular culture.
[2016/05/22 15:08:01] Jimmy Branagh: The theories are endless.
[2016/05/22 15:08:19] Jimmy Branagh: Everyone famous is in the Illuminati, including Jay-Z, the Pope (all of them), Usain Bolt, Glenn Beck, Queen Elizabeth II, George Bush, and Lady Gaga are members. Taylor Swift and Howard Stern are some of its biggest promoters. Stanley Kubrick was an insider who tried to expose it in his film Eyes Wide Shut, and the patron saint of the Masonic silver screen, Nicolas Cage, makes films in promoting its ideals.
[2016/05/22 15:08:30] Jimmy Branagh: That a “global elite” society that is either in control of, or is seeking to take control of, the world.
[2016/05/22 15:08:40] Jimmy Branagh: That Freemasonry and Satanism are the driving forces behind the Illuminati.
[2016/05/22 15:08:47] Jimmy Branagh: That they seek to form a one-world government, a one-world monetary system and a one-world religion.
[2016/05/22 15:08:49] Freya: The Lady Gaga conspiracy videos are worth seeing for the WTF factor.
[2016/05/22 15:08:57] Jimmy Branagh: The entertainment industry is controlled by the Illuminati.
[2016/05/22 15:09:01] Holly: lol
[2016/05/22 15:09:05] engacia: wot? no easterners?
[2016/05/22 15:09:09] Jimmy Branagh: Organizations like the United Nations, European Union, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, G-20 Economic Group, the World Court, NATO, Council on Foreign Relations, World Council of Churches and various multinational corporations are pawns of the New World Order.
[2016/05/22 15:10:09] Jimmy Branagh: Denver is an Illuminati world domination layover site to off the grid blacked out labor camps.
[2016/05/22 15:10:09] Ceejay Writer: I love Nick Cage's stuff about it, really
[2016/05/22 15:10:14] Nicholas Murdock: And of course, all this spawned the Steve Jackson game "Illuminati" :)
[2016/05/22 15:10:14] Jimmy Branagh: Gay Activism and feminism are an Illuminati Conspiracy.
[2016/05/22 15:10:15] Darlingmonster Ember: I've played the game and can prove it.
[2016/05/22 15:10:16] Jimmy Branagh: That the Illuminati is governed by a race of shape-shifting reptilian pedophiles who are ultimately behind an “Orwellian Global Super state”
[2016/05/22 15:10:16] Jimmy Branagh: And a new one on me ...
[2016/05/22 15:10:17] Nicholas Murdock: No no, that's the grays from Zeta Reticuli.
[2016/05/22 15:10:17] Jimmy Branagh: The moon is the home base of the Illuminati.
[2016/05/22 15:10:20] Darlingmonster Ember: ...quick, Jimmy is overheating, get some water
[2016/05/22 15:10:23] Myrtil Igaly: hehe
[2016/05/22 15:10:24] Marianne McCann: SMERSH, aided by the Boy Spouts, will attack to control SMOF
[2016/05/22 15:10:28] Holly: lolol
[2016/05/22 15:10:32] Lady Sumoku: That's silly.
[2016/05/22 15:10:41] Lady Sumoku: Everyone knows the moon is where Dracula lives.
[2016/05/22 15:10:45] Myrtil Igaly: Oooooh
[2016/05/22 15:10:47] Holly: duh
[2016/05/22 15:11:00] Jimmy Branagh: And with that last bon-mot, we come to a close. Thank you everyone for attending!
[2016/05/22 15:11:06] Jimmy Branagh bows
[2016/05/22 15:11:10] Sera Puchkina applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:12] Darlingmonster Ember applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:15] Holly: interesting
[2016/05/22 15:11:18] Marianne McCann claps
[2016/05/22 15:11:19] Captain Killian applaudes
[2016/05/22 15:11:24] Darlingmonster Ember applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:24] Myrtil Igaly applauds and claps
[2016/05/22 15:11:27] Sera Puchkina: Great talk, Jimmy!
[2016/05/22 15:11:28] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:29] Solace Fairlady applauds!
[2016/05/22 15:11:30] Lady Sumoku makes the secret sign of applause.
[2016/05/22 15:11:37] Otenth Håkon Paderborn applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:37] Father Pizzaro applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:39] Darlingmonster Ember applauds
[2016/05/22 15:11:41] Holly: thank you
[2016/05/22 15:11:42] Lunesta Matova: Excellent research and presentation, Jimmy, thank you!
[2016/05/22 15:11:42] Jimmy Branagh: That all timed out perfect this time!
[2016/05/22 15:11:48] Nicholas Murdock: Well done, good talk. Pity we must kill you after this.
[2016/05/22 15:11:49] engacia: very interesting! thank you! applauds!
[2016/05/22 15:11:52] Random Wezzog applauds.
[2016/05/22 15:11:55] Solace Fairlady: bravo master Jimmy!
[2016/05/22 15:11:56] Random Wezzog: Very interesting presentation.
[2016/05/22 15:11:58] Myrtil Igaly: kill h.. wha?
[2016/05/22 15:12:00] Zaida Gearbox applauds wildly
[2016/05/22 15:12:00] Freya applaudds
[2016/05/22 15:12:03] Zaida Gearbox: Hoooo!
[2016/05/22 15:12:04] Freya: That was wonderful
[2016/05/22 15:12:04] Caesar Osterham: Nicely done, Master Branagh
[2016/05/22 15:12:07] Ceejay Writer: Amazing research Jimmeh. I learned SO MUCH. And will read the transcript about a dozen times.
[2016/05/22 15:12:08] Jimmy Branagh: Thank you.
[2016/05/22 15:12:08] Freya: Did I hear mention of a transscript?
[2016/05/22 15:12:09] Lady Sumoku: He knows too much!
[2016/05/22 15:12:11] Jimmy Branagh: ")
[2016/05/22 15:12:18] Myrtil Igaly: So do we now...
[2016/05/22 15:12:23] Zantabraxus applauds
[2016/05/22 15:12:24] Zaida Gearbox: that's what jimmy does - he drinks and he knows things
[2016/05/22 15:12:25] Tamlorn Carterhaugh Wood: That was a lot of work to prepare all that, thank you!
[2016/05/22 15:12:36] Jimmy Branagh: Who is keeping the transcripts these days?
[2016/05/22 15:12:38] Darlingmonster Ember: Of course, they want us to think he knows too much, but we know that they know
[2016/05/22 15:12:43] Dr. Hannibal Carthegan: well done, Jimmy
[2016/05/22 15:12:56] Myrtil Igaly: but they know that we know that they know do you know?
[2016/05/22 15:13:01] Freya: We know that they know that we know that he knows, you known?
[2016/05/22 15:13:05] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Baronin Zanta and the clank are both recording.
[2016/05/22 15:13:06] Myrtil Igaly: hehe
[2016/05/22 15:13:07] Jimmy Branagh: Thank you everyone. I hope you enjoy it. Watch yer back.
[2016/05/22 15:13:07] Caesar Osterham: Oh, and I have posted several pictures of you all to the colorcast. So you can expect visits from your local constabulary soon. :)
[2016/05/22 15:13:07] Lady Sumoku has subverted their plans by not knowing anything.
[2016/05/22 15:13:24] Captain Killian: but i wore a mask!
[2016/05/22 15:13:27] Freya: Well played, madam
[2016/05/22 15:13:31] Silas Merlin: Good bye everyone, thank you Jimmy
[2016/05/22 15:13:35] Jimmy Branagh: Bye Silas
[2016/05/22 15:13:41] Myrtil Igaly: yes I'm masked too so nothing to worry about
[2016/05/22 15:13:44] Jimmy Branagh: Oh, you can turn the lights up now
[2016/05/22 15:13:59] Sera Puchkina waves night and poofs
[2016/05/22 15:14:01] Caesar Osterham: I am Russian, Captain. We know that masks cover nothing.
[2016/05/22 15:14:07] Marianne McCann: This was all very interesting. I shall have to report all this to my higher ups, of course
[2016/05/22 15:14:19] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach grins
[2016/05/22 15:14:26] Nicholas Murdock: Gotta run. Time for my Lodge meeting with the Lindens to plot the takeover of World of Warcraft.
[2016/05/22 15:14:27] Solace Fairlady: a wonderful presentation Jimmy, thank you!
[2016/05/22 15:14:27] Myrtil Igaly: We've got some secret societies in Babbage too
[2016/05/22 15:14:29] Jimmy Branagh: Well, I am probably now on every list in the book, so ...
[2016/05/22 15:14:31] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Are the Moles a branch of the Illuminati?
[2016/05/22 15:14:51] Marianne McCann: They're clearly underground operatives
[2016/05/22 15:14:52] Jimmy Branagh: Oy dunno Herr Baron. It's quite possible
[2016/05/22 15:14:54] Father Pizzaro: Conspiracy theories are seeded to keep those sort of people from doing anything of import.
[2016/05/22 15:14:59] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Oh, well done.
[2016/05/22 15:14:59] Ceejay Writer: *koff* Ceejaytopia *koff*
[2016/05/22 15:15:11] Myrtil Igaly: that's a secret society?
[2016/05/22 15:15:11] Jimmy Branagh laughs at Ceejay
[2016/05/22 15:15:27] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach notes that Fraulein Marianne is obviously Evil.
[2016/05/22 15:15:32] Myrtil Igaly: or the one world government?
[2016/05/22 15:15:34] Ceejay Writer: OKAY, its a blatent society, so sue me.
[2016/05/22 15:15:34] Marianne McCann curtsies
[2016/05/22 15:15:34] Ceejay Writer: Wait, don't.
[2016/05/22 15:15:39] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach chuckles
[2016/05/22 15:15:47] Random Wezzog: Thank you, Master Branagh :) Very interesting talk.
[2016/05/22 15:16:02] Jimmy Branagh: Glad you like it
[2016/05/22 15:16:04] Marianne McCann: I should run along as well. Great talk!
[2016/05/22 15:16:07] Random Wezzog: Goodnight all.
[2016/05/22 15:16:07] Baron Klaus Wulfenbach: Danke, everyone, for attending.
[2016/05/22 15:16:08] Freya: This was wonderful, thank you, Master Branagh, and thank you, Herr Baron!
[2016/05/22 15:16:09] Ceejay Writer: This was wonderful. And now I am off! for a SEEKRET MEETING SOMEWHERE